Web Contents:

HKVCA Home
About Us
BOD Meeting Results
Contacts / Membership
Hall of Valour (CVHV)
Historical/Personal Accts
HKVCA Store
How to Donate
Newsletters
"Remembrances"
Submissions & Links
Suggested Reading
Teachers' Zone
Visiting Hong Kong?


Image Gallery

'C' Force Web


HKVCA Web Help:

Site Map
FAQ


Archives


External Links:

Veterans Affairs Canada

VAC-Veterans Independence Program

War Amps

Military and Related Sites


BOD Only (password required)

Transcribed by Linda King. Interview took place in 1997. Submitted by his daughter, Lori Smith.
_________

Listen to another interview done by the Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature and read another interview on this site.


 

Please state your full name.

Harold Angus Martin Atkinson

Good morning Mr. Atkinson would you tell me sir where and when you were born.

I was born in Selkirk Manitoba, the 14th of February 1922

Did you take your early education in Selkirk?

I grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 in Selkirk, my dad died in 1931 and my mother and I moved to Winnipeg and lived with… turnabout sister to sister, they were married they were quite a bit older than me.  She would have an argument with one of them and we’d move in with the other sister, so I had a roundabout early childhood in that sense.

What did your father do for a living?

My dad was a foreman of a, at that time, there wasn’t the coast guard then - it come under the federal government.  Selkirk Manitoba, at that time was the headquarters for all the lake boats that went up Lake Winnipeg and when he died he was foreman of what we call the Government Yards the dry dock where boats come in to be repaired and everything else.  He was from Baton Lincolnshire England.

Was he a veteran?

Of the First World War.

Do you remember hearing stories about his time?

My dad told me very few stories, the only thing I can recall is the things he termed “happy times”.  He and my mother’s brother John  - my Uncle John, both joined the 108th battalion and went overseas with it and I think after there it was a dispersed battalion and was reinforcing other areas.

During the time of your mother being the single parent of your family, the depression was on - What impact did that have on your childhood?

I laugh today when people talk about welfare, the dollars are different now to what they were then but for a period of time my mother and I were on what was called relief.  I would go down to the Cataman building on Main Street [in Winnipeg] every Friday and pick up our relief tickets.  We got $5.00 a week for groceries we got $2.00 a week for milk and my mother always said that I could buy a bag of peanuts and I used to go shopping at Eaton’s groceteria down on Portage Avenue.

It was a difficult time for you and your mother, and what did you do after school.

At that time when I speak of being on relief, we lived in - we’ll say a tenement – we had 2 rooms in a tenement and the young fellow downstairs, the whole family downstairs were named Riddock and young Reg ended up in the Grenadier same way I did.  I didn’t meet him until I got to Jamaica, but I sold papers on the corner of Portage Avenue.  We made 2 ½ cents on each paper - the paper cost 5 cents and we got 2 and a half cents.  Reg had the Free Press and I had the Tribune.  He was on one corner and I was on the other.  We got together and we’d split our papers so we had both papers to sell.  That’s the way we worked it.

How far did you go in school?

It’s a long story.  I finished grade 9 and I started into grade 10 at St. John’s Tech and I liked to play football and my marks weren’t good enough to play football and my mother had married in 1935 and my stepfather was manager of the China Ware Department at Ashdowns the retail store, and he got me a job at Ashdowns and I quit school and went to work for $5.00 a week.

What did you do at Ashdowns?

The first year and a half I was what was called Buy Boy.  I took departmental buys over to Ashdowns  wholesale and had them filled and then they would be delivered to the store.  Then I went into the cutlery department and into the blacksmith department as a sales clerk.  In 1940 in the summer, unknown to me, I had a brother.  I decided to join the army and I ended up out at Fort Osborne barracks and who did I meet but my brother.  He was 11 years older than me and he had decided to join up.  I think we both had the same thought that had we not enlisted and volunteered to fight for our country that our old man, our old dad would turn over in his grave because he was a real believer in defending one’s rights and one’s country.

Had you seen your brother very often before that?

I should have mentioned that, up until we went on relief he had lived with us, but he was 11 years older and had his trade, he was a butcher and he had his own job and he and, how can I put it, he and my mother used to clash.  She didn’t believe in the way he was operating or living and he decided to move out.  I don’t blame him.  My mother was a good mother but she was a tough old gal.  She lived till she was 87. 

She’d remarried you indicated in 1935 so there were no financial obligations on you to help her.

Oh no, there was no difficulty that way, no.  Bill Linklater my stepfather was a damn good stepfather.

You’ve indicated you’ve enlisted in the Canadian Army, can you tell me why you chose the Canadian Army?

Well, Oh a number of reasons.  The young store detective at Ashdowns – John Millen, if I remember, yes John Millen decided that we were going to join the Navy and we went down to Sherbook and Ellis where HMCS Chippewa had their enlistment.  And a boy scout/wolf cub that I knew had some memory of Semaphore and was going to go into the Navy Signals and they said “we don’t need you right now but within a month or two, we will write you and call you in”.  And that’s the way it went.   I went back to Ashdowns and I got fed up and I decided to go to Fort Osborne and I joined the Army.  As I say, just the way it worked out my brother was out the same day.  I enlisted twice.  Went through medical – old Doc McTavish, I went to school with his kids.  Went through the medical and we got up before Sergeant Major Kairns to swear us in and he looked at my documents and said “you’re only 18” and he tore them up and he said “come back in a couple of years we don’t need you yet” And I went back to work.  I was out there the next week and went through and old doc McTavish said “ what are you doing here again Atkinson?”   I said I was 18 last week and I’m 20 today, fill it out.  Parents never said a thing so my Army age is 2 years older than what it actually is.

From the point of enlistment at Fort Osborne where did you go then?

Well at that time none of the units in Winnipeg were recruiting or reinforcing or anything else, at that time the federal government department of national defence started a 30 day training program.  They called up men between the ages, I think it was 20 or 21 and 30, that were single for one month’s training.  I had been in the MPMA Militia and I ended up as a Lance Corporal Instructor and my brother was the same.  We ended up in Brandon in the 101st Training Centre and the first group of trainees we had come in was in September of 1941 – 1940 pardon me - 1940.  They would be there for a month then we’d get a week’s break and we’d have another group come in.  In January of 1941 the Colonel sent 2 of us, John Irwin from Pine Falls and myself to Lethbridge to the small arms training school to take a PT & Antigas course and we were there 6 – 8 weeks and when we got back my brother had gone to Winnipeg and his gang, the other NCOs, to the University of Manitoba to take an artillery training course.  They would train both 30 day trainees and regular army men.  I was on MP duty for staff on a Saturday night ,I can’t tell you the date but downtown Sarg Tracy came down and said Atkinson your brother wants you to phone him – here’s the number.  And I phoned Ronny and he said if you want to get away with us overseas you better get your ass in here tomorrow because 8 of us in here are transferring to the Grenadiers to go to Jamaica on a reinforcement draft and I got in on a Sunday.  The Colonel was quite conducive.  I told him I had joined up to go overseas.  But he said we’d like to keep you here for instructor and I said no, I’m going.  And I was in Winnipeg on Sunday but they didn’t send my documents so I didn’t get into Sherbrooke Que with the 70 men to train for 6 weeks, I was in the district depot until they got back.  We ended up going to Jamaica in – I haven’t got the dates down – but it was the middle of May 1941 and down there we were up at Newcastle in the rest camp for I guess 6 weeks and they gave us 3 weeks to give us a choice of Company and I picked D Company.  There were 8 of us stayed together and we picked D Company because it was coming up next for the month rest and we got 6 to 8 weeks in Newcastle.  We always laughed about that.  We come back down and started doing guard duty on the interment camp. Regular duty.

What was your impression of the internment camp?

The Germans and the Italians?  They lived like Kings.  They lived like kings.  Anything they wanted they got.  I can’t recall the size of it but we had 4 corner posts with Lewis Guns – we had live ammunition - and about every 50 feet around the perimeter there was a post and about every 15 – 20 minutes the ground crew in the perimeter would shift posts.  I recall a fella by the name Murray, Jimmy Murray – he lived in Saskatoon actually.  He was on the tower one day and he let loose with the Lewis Gun at the German Swastika Flag that had been put up.  The flag never went back up and he got confined to barracks or detention for firing at the flag.  The internees lived like kings they weren’t prisoners of war.  The large majority of them were civilians they were off merchant ships and civilians areas the British had moved into in Italian Africa – that’s just what it amounted to.

What was the attitude of those internees, did they appear to you to be in any way defeated or sullen or were they…

Oh no, no they were more arrogant than anything else, more arrogant than anything else.  There was a black man in there  - Bustamanti, he ended up after the war as Prime minister or Premier whatever they call them of Jamaica and he became Sir Bustamanti.  So there you are.  He was a very radical socialist and the British Authorities interned him.

How would you describe the duty of the Grenadiers at Jamaica, what type of duty would it have been?

Garrison duty.

Was there any infantry training done at Jamaica

Well not in my case.  There was an area called Mt Pelliard and periodically a company would go to Mt Pelliard for infantry type training, but any training we did get was First Word War warfare type of training – trench warfare, what have you.  Where somebody would blow a whistle and you’d go over the top.  Now, any training any of us had – even the Royal Rifles – was entirely different from the way we had to fight in Hong Kong.  But we’ll get down to that.

Yes.  How long did you stay in Jamaica - roughly?

Well that was a pleasure cruise.  There was 70 men and 11 officers, I think – reinforcing officers on that trip.  We left some time in May.  As I said it was a pleasure cruise.  I was back in Winnipeg in the middle of September.   As D Company had been the first company to go to Jamaica, D Company was the first company to come back.  We joined the right Company.

So, you’re back in Winnipeg and clearly the higher command has another purpose for the Grenadiers.

Well we were told that we would be re-equipped and we would eventually joined one of the Divisions that was being organized and as it got closer to the time we left we were they issued us KD equipment -  KD was Khaki Drill – shorts , putties, new sun helmets ,and we began to wonder because where in the hell were we going?  They told us we were going to Vancouver for further training.  And that’s all we knew.  Strangely enough, the day we left, my dad – my step father, never told me but as I say, he managed the Chinaware dept of Ashdown’s retail and he did business with the Chinese restaurants in Chinatown and the day we marched down he told me an old Chinese friend of his from one of the restaurants said those boys are going to Hong Kong.  They already knew.  So if they new, the Japanese must have known we were going too, with the intelligence systems that were around.

Before leaving Canada what was your impression of the state of readiness of the Grenadiers?

Well, from a point of training, when I say this, I’m not separating one group of Grenadiers from another but the original Grenadier regiment that went to Jamaica in 1940 were a well trained Vickers gun battalion.  They knew those Vickers guns from A to Z.  In fact we got a man here, I don’t know if you ever interviewed Buster Agerback but Buster was on a Vickers gun crew and those fellas could strip a Vickers gun and stick it back together in nothing flat.  They had lots of Vickers gun training but they were trained as a machine gun battalion.  Some of us, in my case, I was an Antigas and PT instructor.  I had qualifications.   I had been over an assault course just outside of Shilo.   I had had bullets shot over my head.  We did that to put on a display for 30 day trainees.  Some of the reinforcements we picked up had been in the army and had been instructors in the army for 2 years when they joined us in October of 1941 as we went across Canada.  But a lot of them – where, well my brother-in-law had only been – my eventual brother-in-law – had only been in the army 3 weeks – never had a rifle in his hands.  There were a lot of them that way.

Sounds very uneven.

Very uneven.

What happened when you got to Vancouver Mr. Atkinson?

There’s a number of stories about what happened.  As it was our Company – D Company, that some of us got off the boat, I’ll tell you the story.  A train pulled right into the dockyards where the boats were, on the side – there were 5 or 6 CPR tracks in there.  And we got off and marched out through the warehouse and incidentally that warehouse is still there.  We got on the SSH – HA- HMS Awatea, it was a ship that brought Australian and New Zealand air force personnel to Canada to train.  And we were packed into different areas.  D Company we were lucky our area was adjacent to the poop deck at the back just above the water.  Hammocks – we got settled in’ the first meal we had was tripe and the complaints started.  Well, somebody said that – and I remember the story in the free press - that in Halifax in the summer of 1941 , the air force was on their way overseas and disliked their conditions, and en mass they marched off the boat in stood on the docks and conditions were changed – they even got white sheets on their beds – we were in hammocks so we figured lets get off and let them know.  And we did.  And Captain Neil Bardal [ended up Captain Neil Bardal]    - Lieutenant Bardal was our transport officer, and he come down and told us if we didn’t get back on, we would be charged with desertion or mutiny or whatever.  90% of us got on but the one’s that had organized it when we got off on the dock, had disappeared through the warehouse and that’s the reason they had done it, that’s the only way I can see for it.  And some of them jumped the train on the way west too.  Some of the guards – the NCO put guards on the door, jumped the train.

HOW MANY MEN DO YOU THINK WOULD HAVE DESERTED?

You got me there, I would estimate close to 20 from Winnipeg to Vancouver and that episode on the docks.  But there were no Rifles in that group.

FROM VANCOUVER YOU’RE ON THE AWATEA

After that little, we’ll call it a riot – that disturbance they unhooked from the dock and pulled out into the harbor, over night and we left the next day.  I guess they figured if anyone was strong enough to swim to shore that was the way it was going to be.

BY THIS TIME DID ANYONE HAVE ANY CLEAR IDEA WHERE YOU WERE GOING?

No, no idea at all.  We weren’t advised as to where we were going – I don’t think before Hawaii it was after we stopped in Hawaii to fuel up, that we were told we were going to Hong Kong.  But we had a Sergeant in D Company – Johnny Long he was missing in action.  Johnny Long told us that we were going to Singapore and he didn’t know whether we were or not but that was his opinion.  And again because of our summer drill - we had shorts and putties.

WHEN YOU WERE TOLD YOU WERE GOING TO HONG KONG, MR. ATKINSON WHAT WAS THE GENERAL REACTION?

Well, we were told it was going to be a garrison type job this is the message we got from our platoon officer, this is what they were told.  It would be very similar to the job we had been doing in Jamaica, and that’s about it.  But one officer did tell us we might have to fight our way off the boat.  This is as we got closer to Hong Kong.

AT THAT TIME DID YOU KNOW WHO THE ENEMY WAS LIKELY TO BE?

Well we always knew it was Japan.  Once we found out we were going to Hong Kong we knew who the enemy would be. 

CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT THE PASSAGE THEN FROM VANCOUVER TO HONG KONG?

Well it was un-eventful in that sense. We did training, some of the fellas had never fired a Bren Gun, we did some Bren Gun training some Bren Gun firing. No one of us had seen a 2 inch mortar or even a 3 inch mortar.  We had heard stories about them.  They had dummy drills on mortars – there were no mortar bombs to practice with.  But one event, young - then Lance Corporal Robinson – Roy Robinson from Winnipeg, was on submarine watch and had spotted a submarine - at night .  I guess in the florescence of the water, but it was an American submarine so we were quite safe – but he was commended for his sharp eyes as he was the lance corporal of that submarine guard.  But no, we kept in shape, we could run the deck, we had boxing matches with gloves on, but that’s about all.  It was an uneventful trip in that sense.  When we pulled in Hawaii, the Hawaiian dancing girls came down to the dock and danced for us.  Right adjacent to us was the, I think it was the Lisbon Maru – from San Francisco loaded with Japanese from the states that were going back to Japan and that ship the Lisbon Maru was sunk with almost all the Royal Scots and almost all of the Middlesex being transferred from Hong Kong as prisoners to Japan.  It had been sunk by an American Submarine.  But our trip – the balance of that trip, was uneventful.  We pulled in Philippines and we had an escort with us – the Prince Robert - a converted pleasure boat and one Company of Rifles was on it.  When we left Manila a British cruiser had come down from Hong Kong to double escort us.  But an uneventful trip.   We left Manila and were in Hong Kong the next morning.

WHAT WAS YOUR IMPRESSION OF HONG KONG WHEN THE SHIP ARRIVED.

Well first of all – the smells (laughter) you’ve never been to Hong Kong?  Even today you fly in there and get off the plane you get the same Hong Kong smells that we got – the only term I can use is sewer smell – it is tremendous.  It’s not as bad now as 1941 but in 1941 in some areas the open soil was open sewer, –it’s where the smells come from.

WHAT DO YOU REMEMBER ABOUT THE WELCOME THAT YOU RECEIVED?

Well I wasn’t on the march from the dock to Sham Shui Po.  I was delegated to load the kits from our company.  And I had a pleasant truck ride to Sham Shui Po, but I saw nothing – the only thing I can recall seeing on movies or still pictures are the welcome the British people and Chinese gave to the Canadians.  But if you talk to the fellas they will tell you, you could hear the remarks from some of them in the crowd about “they’re not all Indians” – well there you are, that’s the way people looked at Canadians in those days.  We’re lucky we got more troops, things like that.  But I didn’t have the luck of marching to Sham Shui Po from the docks.

MR ATKINSON YOU WERE JUST TELLING US ABOUT THE UNLOADING OF THE AWATEA AND THE FACT THAT YOU WERE INVOLVED IN LOADING OF THE EQUIPMENT ABOARD TRUCK.  CAN YOU TELL US WHAT HAPPENED THEN?

Well, we drove Nathan road in Kowloon to Sham Shui Po and I can recall seeing all these Chinese people on the street.  One impression I got –the first thing I saw was the number of chahoom – beggars – sitting there wanting alms as they call them – and that surprised me because even in Jamaica the poor black people didn’t get paid much by the British – they got a trumpence a day but their hampers fell on the rocks at a rate of a trumpence a day too.  But in Hong Kong there was a large, large number of out and out beggars every time you turned around there was one behind you.

SO THERE WAS A LOT OF POVERTY GENERALLY?

Yes

WHAT WAS YOUR IMPRESSION OF SHAM SHUI PO BARRACKS WHEN YOU ARRIVED THERE?

Typical British style barracks, same as in Jamaica in that sense.  We got into our huts and we had the same old iron beds that you closed up in morning and you pulled out at night, the mattress was 3 biscuits filled with what is called koya that’s made from coconut shell , that brown coconut shell you see today – not that but the husks that was on the outside of the brown coconut shell, and in Jamaica detention, barracks fellas used to hammer that stuff and it spreads out like – we won’t say coconut – but spreads out like heavy straw and that’s what filled palliotsus they were called – the biscuits – that was our mattress.

I UNDERSTAND THERE WERE SOME CHINESE SERVANTS IN CAMP.

Within a day we had Chinese coming in, in fact some of them – unless you were careful – and once you got to know them it was alright, but they’d have you lathered up in the morning and be shaving you before you even woke up.  25 cents a week Hong Kong – that’s about the cost of it and they even made our beds up.  There were maybe 2 or 3 in each hut.

HOW LONG DID THAT GO ON?

Well almost from the time we landed in barracks until we left to go to the island.  Last time we left, the day before the Japanese attacked.

Did you have the opportunity of speaking with any of the British regulars or the Indians?

Well we met some of the Middlesex and some of the Royal Scotts, we became friendly with.  We met them in the Sung Sung restaurant.  That’s another story.  But their impression was they had been given the wrong impression too, they had been there for years - that the Japanese would never attack and that we could hold them off.  It was their opinion.  But the battle of the Sung Sung – Sung Sung  was a restaurant and on the second floor was a dine and dance – not dine but booze and dancing girls, that’s where you met your Suzi Q.  The Saturday I guess, the Saturday before the weekend the Japanese attacked, we had a fella in the Grenadiers by the name Ganier - he was French and he spoke a combination of French and English and one of the Middlesex or Royal Scotts called him a territorial and he objected to it and he stood up and the at started the fight.  They objected to the amount of money we had, they couldn’t get a rickshaw ride because they’d give a rickshaw driver 10 cents Hong Kong to pull them from camp to where ever they were going and Canadians would give the rickshaw drivers 2 bits for rickshaw rides.  They objected to the amount of pay we got.  Their pay was a mere pittance.  I guess we never had to settle on the cost of repairs to the Sung-Sung because the battle started within a week.

ARE YOU DIPLOMATIC ENOUGH TO SAY THE BATTLE OF SUNG-SUNG WAS A DRAW?

Well the British MPs – we won – because the British MPs were called and they wouldn’t go upstairs because there were tough Canadians up there. That dispensed it. Down at the bottom of the stairs the restaurant had a big fish tank – goldfish and everything else - and there was a whirlizer at the top of the stairs and that ended up in the fish tank.  You know the problems that would arrive.  No I would say the Rifles and the Grenadiers that were in there won the battle.

THERE WAS A BIGGER BATTLE COMING OF COURSE          

That we didn’t know about

STILL NO INKLING THAT THE JAPANESE WERE TO ATTACK?

Well, no not actually.  The NCOs, some of our NCOs  had been taken up to the border to see the Japanese defences and the British defences.  Our company had been over to manning exercises it was called to our – what would be our position.  And, we went over for the 2nd one about a day before we moved over and that’s the way it ended up.  The morning it happened, it would be December 8th over there December 7th over here because of the date line.  Young I think his first name was Earl – Earl Till from Minitonas Manitoba.  He and I were on guard duty at the Pill Box we had and the phone rang.  I was up at the top of the whole we dug with the Bren Gun and he was down at the door.  And the phone rang and he went in and the call was for Lieutenant Mitchell.  The message was, we were at war with Japan.  This would be 6:30 - 7 o’clock in the morning and in a matter of minutes Japanese bombers were coming over.  You know what would happen – everybody in the whole platoon and pill box were out on the hill watching the bombers.  We then knew for sure we were at war, lets put it that way.

MR. ATKINSON LETS DEAL FOR A MOMENT with THE ACTUAL SITUATION THAT CONFRONTED THE GRENADIERS AT THAT TIME, YOU’ve ALREADY MENTIONED THAT THE TRAINING THEY received up to this point was uneven, other MEN WEREN’T TRAINED AT ALL.  HAVING SAID THAT, WHAT WEAPONS DID THE REGIMENT HAVE?

Well we had old Vickars Guns with us, we got from the British in the Pill box, we had, each platoon had at least one Bren Gun and the NCOs in most cases in D company, each of our NCOs, the Sergeant, the corporal and lance corporal, would have Tommy guns, Thompson sub- machine guns – the rest of us had our 303s and Enfield. In our case our platoon had no mortars- no 2” mortars.

The Regiment had no artillery either?

We had no artillery go over with us, no.  We had to rely on what British artillery was there.

So the Regiment had no artillery and no heavy mortars?

Well we had mortar sections that had 3” mortars but no mortar bombs until after the battle started.  Then they got very few 3” mortars.

No HEAVY MACHINE GUNS?

WE took no vicars gun with us, the vicar guns we got we got from the British.

SO THE MEN WERE GENERALLY OUTFITTED WITH HAND GRENADES AND…

Hand grenades, we had hand grenades and some of the hand grenades we ended up getting weren’t primed.

IN ADDITION TO ALL THAT THE MEN DID NOT KNOW THE TERRAIN

Right, in D Company our Company was at Wong Nei Chong Gap.  There’s quite a story about Wong Nei Chong Gap.  Our platoon – Eric Mitchell’s platoon had the pill box at the top of the gap and we had 2 pill boxes around the catch water on the lower slopes of   Jardine’s lookout.  In the short while we were there, before the Japanese landed, we knew the areas around our own pill boxes but the Japanese landed the night of the 18th and the afternoon of the 18th they moved- our orders came in for our platoon to move out of the pill boxes and they put in Hong Kong volunteers in them.  We kept the pill box at the top of the Gap that was our platoon headquarters, but the other 2 pill boxes was manned by Hong Kong volunteers.

JUST BACK UP A MOMENT IF WE COULD MR. ATKINSON TO THE OUTBREAK YOU’VE INDICATED EARLIER WHAT HAPPENED FIRST Japanese aerial attack on the Island.  Very quickly the Japanese land forces in the new territories overran – my understanding was that initially the British could hold that position for weeks .

Well Maltby’s idea was that the Gin Drinkers Line was strong enough to withstand a breakthrough.  The Gin Drinkers line would be, I couldn’t tell you how far, but I would estimate 5 to 7 miles from the actual border and the British Troops were all at the Gin Drinkers Line but the advance party did the demolition work and moved back and one of the Punjab companies were their guard and the Japanese never come down the roads, they moved overland – they knew the country better than we did, and they were well trained at that type of warfare.  I think it was Colonel Sojay, a Japanese Colonel of one of the companies forget the regiments, I forget the number, 130 Regiment I think, spotted from Ti Marchan Mountain, if memory serves me correct, spotted the Gin Drinkers Line and figured that he could break through.  Now that wasn’t in his sector but he sent a company in after dark and they overran the Royal Scotts at the Gin Drinkers Line – that was where the breakthrough started.  Now Maltby castigated the Royal Scotts for not holding their positions but I’ll put it this way, that Company of Royal Scotts that had that section of the Gin Drinkers Line were under-strength.  They had been up there working and it was in malaria season, they had malaria, they were sick – some of them.  The Company was almost half-strength and the Japanese had no problem breaking into that sector.  They had in a matter of hours that area taken and Maltby wouldn’t allow any Rajputs to move in to drive them out.  When that happened incidentally D Company of the Grenadiers had gone to Wong Nei Chong Gap where what was termed,  a mobile company and they took us over to the mainland then, and we were told the next morning we were going to fight a rear guard action for the Royal Scotts and we moved up the Ti Po Road almost above our old Camp Sham Shui Po – you could see the camp. We were opposite Stone Cutters Island on a curve in the road.  Mitchell’s platoon, our platoon, had the catch water defense position and we had one section up on the hill on our right, as a defense on the right, and another section down below.  The other 2 companies – the other 2 platoons were spread down below us and out.  We never saw Japanese all day.  About 6 o’clock – 5:30 they came and told us we were going to move out back to the dock yards.  We hedge hogged down a section would stop and we’d move through them, then another section would stop and the rear guard would move down through.  When we got down to where our Chinese trucks were we couldn’t move them, the Chinese drivers had disappeared and they wouldn’t run.  Anyway, we eventually ended up down on the docks – the ship building yards and they brought a ferry over, we got on the ferry and went over to the Island .  But we had been there I guess , we were at the polo grounds – we went over at night and we were at the polo grounds all that night and the next day and then, if I had my book here I have a few records, I would say it was the morning of the 11th – the 10th, we moved up the 10th we moved up in position on the Ti Po Road and we evacuated that night .  We eventually ended up at Wong Nei Chong Gap a couple of days later.

NO SHOTS FIRED BY THE GRENADIERS?

Not our platoon, but  Bob Manchester’s  platoon had a skirmish,  I think the other platoon did too.  We had 2 men disappear on that – Captain Bowman sent them on a scouting mission up towards the Shing Mun Reservoir [Redoubt] that the Japanese had taken over, and when we left that position they hadn’t come back.  Swanson and a young fella from rural Manitoba, we never saw him again.  Swanson ended up on the Island, he got mixed up with the Royal Scotts but, oh damn it, I can’t recall this fellas name , but anyway we never saw him again.  And in the series “Savage Christmas” that’s where I disagree - I don’t disagree he was the first Canadian killed in Hong Kong , he was missing in action, but in that book “Savage Christmas” that section of it the writers depict how he died before Japanese fire.  That is entirely untrue because he was from Manchester’s platoon and Swanson ended back in Wong Nei Chong with us two days later but we never saw – oh damn – I feel bad about that, I know his name just like that – but he was from rural Manitoba north of Brandon in the Grossburn area.

THE KEY THING HERE THOUGH IS THAT THE GRENADIERS HAVE THE DISTINCTION OF BEING THE FIRST CANADIAN ARMY Unit TO COME UNDER FIRE.

In the Second World War, yes D Company of the Winnipeg Grenadiers.

THE D COMPANY YOU HAVE INDICATED HAD PULLED BACK AND WENT BACK

We ended up in Wong Nei Chong gap a couple of days later.

HOW LONG WAS IT BEFORE THE JAPANESE OVERRAN THE Kowloon AREA?

Well by the night of the 11th  or the morning of the 12th there were no more allied troops on the mainland.  Maybe in scattered areas – no large defense positions they all evacuated, those who could get out.

WHAT WAS THE EFFECT on the Morale ON THE MEN ON THE ISLAND TO HAVING THE JAPANESE OVERRUN A SUPPOSEDLY STRONG DEFENSIVE POSITION THAT QUICKLY?

Well I would say we disbelieved in anything, I disbelieved as most of us disbelieved anything that came out of Maltby’s office or his headquarters.  We knew if they ever landed on the Island we were going to be in for a tough fight and it wasn’t going to last too long – you could see that.  But  Maltby – General Maltby’s propaganda was good propaganda but it never boosted any morale – as far as I’m concerned, if the rest of them were like me you could see what was going to happen.

Is it YOUR IMPRESSION THAT MOST OF THE MEN KNEW THE FIGHT WAS GOING TO BE HOPELESS?

I’m quite sure of that, quite sure of that.

What happened next?

Well as I said, we moved back into our pill boxes – our platoon – that’s the reason I can only speak for our platoon and our Company.  The afternoon, morning or noon hour of the 18th they moved 2 of our sections out of pill box 2 and 3 up on the lower slopes of Jardine’s Lookout .  We all ended up back in pill box 1 right at the top of the Gap and it would be about oh, I guess 7 o’clock – it was getting dark and one of our Company runners come up and we were told we had to go and guard  the Wong Nei Chong reservoir.  I guess about 10 o’clock it would be, a runner come up and Mitchell had to go down to company headquarters.  He went down to see Bowman – he come back up and said we are leaving one section here and the other 2 sections were moving up to Stanley Gap. We were going to meet up with A Company of the Winnipeg Grenadiers. We went up to Mount Butler and we had a Chinese guide.  We wandered the slopes at daybreak the next morning  - we were on the lower slopes of Jardine’s Lookout, no Chinese guide he had disappeared.  We never new any part of that company at all.  As it got lighter, Eric Mitchell got his map out and he could spot Mount Butler and he knew where we where – you could see our old pill box and just at that time Tippy McKorrister from Portage La Prairie whispered that the shrubs down there were moving.  Now that part of the country the Chinese even dug up the roots for firewood.  And when you see it today its unbelievable the amount of vegetation and tree growth but in that time there was very little in those hills. And he pointed it out to Mitchell – Mitchell called for fire power, everybody let go, I don’t know if we got them or not  but what I will say here, when I had to fire and knowing I was shooting at a human, I wet my pants – shooting rabbits when I was a kid was a cinch - I was a good shot, but I never aimed at a human being before and never thought I was going to be.  That was the reason I wet my pants, we’ll call it buck fever or whatever.  We were laying on the bald lower slope of the catch water and Mitchell pointed to a ridge and said lets get over that ridge and we’ve got some cover – but we didn’t know what was on the other side.  Well he looked at his map again and he spotted Mount Butler and he said lets go down this valley we’ll find A Company over there somewhere.  We met up with them about 10 o’clock in the morning and the part of A Company had already been up to Mount Butler and been driven off , that’s where Osborn was and we met them on a ridge overlooking the Tai Tam reservoir and when you looked over the edge you looked across at the sandy red sandy soil on the other side of the water – there were thousands of Japanese over there.   And unknown to us we had hundreds of Japanese below us.  We were on a ridge.  Grenades came over – we threw grenades back and some of our grenades came back at us because there were no primers on them, that’s when we found out some of them weren’t  primed.  About 4 o’clock Major Gresham  - the position was hopeless and Major Gresham called the officers over and they decided we would pull back down the valley to get back to Wong Nei Chong D Company .  We didn’t know what was behind us.  We started out and called in the Brens that were out on the edges of the sections and we lost Charlie Smith on one Bren Gun and his second man, the man that put the magazines on for him and a kid I went to school with in the North end of Winnipeg – Carvery, Sam Carvery was on the other Bren Gun but young Oscar Goodman from Selkirk that I went to school with – Oscar was number 2 with his man and he come back with the Bren.  We ended up we left that area and went back toward Stanley and Wong Nei Chong Gap and 2 of the men were carrying Captain Carver – Lyle Carver he’d been wounded – stomach wound and he was losing a lot of blood and he told them then “put me down on these rocks I’m not going to make it.  I’ve got my revolver if I need it” and they left him.  Jim McIver and I don’t know who the other fella was.  We ended up at a gully and some of the fellas started up and the Japanese were already there below us at Stanley Gap this is just above Wong Nei Chong Gap.  And nowhere near Stanley where the rifles were, but this is a spot called Stanley Gap and there was a British antiaircraft position, and after we had left there and walked down the valley to meet A Company that’s when the Japanese had moved in.  That was our final battle.  That’s the night of the 19th.  That’s where Osborn, John Osborn lost his life.  They were in a position to move in underneath us.  We could see the Japanese but we couldn’t see straight down because of the ridge and that’s when they threw their grenades over and he was throwing them back and one was too late and he fell on it, from what Sergeant Pugsley said John Osborn  with his helmet  - put his helmet on it and lay on top of it.  And that was it. 

FOR THAT, SERGEANT-MAJOR OSBORN RECEIVED THE VICTORIA CROSS POSTHUMOUSLY.

Had Pugsley not come home and Corporal Hall, Jack Pollock, and one other fella, I don’t think that story of John Osborn would have been told because I didn’t see it happen.  Earl Till and I , Earl was my number 2 – I took a Bren Gun over.  Earl Till and I – it was a half circle, half moon shape ridge – Earl Till and I were on one edge and Osborn where he was – the other gun was on the other corner – other end of the ridge.   We heard the grenades and one thing I missed – when somebody yelled grenades, everybody ducked and I pulled my helmet over my head and number 2 on the Bren gun lays on his back and puts the magazines on the Bren Gun and I heard Till give a groan – a grenade went off and Till gave a groan.  I said “Till what’s wrong” and he said I think I’m hit and he had a grenade go in his stomach.  Well, we put a field dressing kit on him best we could.  By this time we had no Bren Gun ammunition left – it was all gone, and very little rifle ammunition and Major Gresham, I guess with the number of wounded that we had, figured discretion was the better part of valor – some of them wanted him to wait till dark – complete dark – and we’d get out and he said no if we do that we’d have to leave those wounded because they couldn’t walk.  And Major Gresham walked up the ridge waving his white hanky and they shot him and killed him.  It wasn’t long after that that they came around and disarmed us and took us prisoner.  That’s the last time I saw Oscar Goodwin, we had a Metis from St. Laurent Manitoba – Leo De’Laurier, he was about 6’5 tall and skinny, as I always said skinny Indian but damn good fighter, and Oscar Goodwin was a little shorter than me.  As they were marching us down with our hands up they pulled De’Laurier and Goodwin out and we never saw them again but we heard them all night.  They had to be using them for – whatever Jap brought back – we’d see them do – fleshing their steel as we would call it.  We never saw either Goodwin or De’Laurier again. 

HOW LONG DID IT TAKE FOR THEM TO DIE?

Well we never heard them after daylight the next morning.  I would say it took them almost all night to die.  They disarmed us in some cases they took our wristwatches, wallets, pictures they wouldn’t leave us anything and they marched us down the hill, we had our hands up and if you dropped your hands at all they put you in the back with a bayonet.  I’m lucky it didn’t happen to me.  They marched us down this slope, this road to a position at Stanley Gap where the British had their antiaircraft positions and they put us in a large garage building, it would be maybe 30’ long and 20’ wide and we would number maybe, there was no more than 50 men if there were that.  We got jammed in there.  Stan Beatty and I got in the corner and there was a bench along the wall and we stood on the bench in the corner – they kept shoving people in and Stan remarked to me that he wondered where his brother Ike was and I said yes I was wondering about Ronnie too.  All of a sudden down below me I heard, “Harold, is that you” , it was my brother right below me.   He had been wounded in the arm, he ended up in one of those Pill boxes below Jardine’s lookout.  He and Derrick Ricks both received a decoration for part of their action.  I can tell you about that after.  Anyway, the next morning just at daybreak, we knew day was breaking because the roof and the wall had a gap in it and daylight was coming in.  We heard a mortar bomb whiz over, drop – another one was short and next one come through the corner of the roof and young Eric Mitchell was right below it.  He was wounded with shrapnel and slivers, I won’t say he was unrecognizable but he was pretty badly wounded.  His brother Vaughn – last time I saw Lt. Vaughn Mitchell was in A Company, and when they took us out of there, there were a number of men killed and wounded in that building, Tommy Matte was one of them and I think Buster Agerback’s brother Tiger was in there wounded.  He had come in wounded and was killed in there.  The next morning when they moved us out, none of the wounded – they wouldn’t let us take any of them unless they could walk.  We never saw Eric Mitchell or Vaughn Mitchell again.  Vaughn wouldn’t leave his brother, but Lieutenant McKillop from Portage La Prairie walked, he had a gunshot wound and he marched with us.  They tied us up in groups of 4 with our own telephone communication wire, our hands were behind our backs tied and a loop around your neck.  They tied 4 or 5 of you together and if your hands dropped or anybody else slacked off it tightened on your neck, not like a garrote, but enough to bother you.  They marched us from there down Stanley Road towards the Tai Tam reservoir at that Tai Tam Gap actually and up over the hill and ended up at North Point.  Along the way a kid from Carmen Manitoba – I can’t remember his first name, Kilfoyle had  been wounded and couldn’t keep up and all the Jap guard did was cut him out and we continued on.   We heard Kilfoyle scream and we could just imagine what happened to him – they bayoneted him and shoved him over the cliff.   We ended up in North Point that night and the only drink of water we had at that time that we had since the day before , we didn’t have our water bottles with us – was a drink of water – rain water, that was coming down at the end of the catch water.  We caught rain off the roof of the huts at North Point – some of them had their steel helmets.  They marched us then to the ferry and took us over to the convent Kowloon side, I forget the street it was on.  I’ve been over there since.  Which was very close to the Argyle Camp in there in the MaryKnoll mission was the first anything we had to eat or drink.  The Catholic priest got the Japanese to give us some hard tack biscuits and some water and to let us tend to some of  the wounded .  The next day they took us into Argyle and we had nothing to cook with and eventually they brought some rice in and the fellas that could cook set up a sort of cook facility in the kitchen.

HOW BIG A CAMP WAS THIS ARGYLE CAMP?

It was a former Chinese refugee camp.  I would estimate then about 8 huts in it – British style huts again, they’d be about 60’ long 20’ wide and a cement floor.  The next morning, the first thing about 5 o’clock in the morning was artillery going off in your ear.   The Japanese had moved up onto the flats and had moved their big artillery pieces up and were firing over to the Island.  By this time, this was about the 21st or 22nd, the only thing we got to eat was rice once a day – whatever it was.  And on the 26th of December they picked out about 30 of us and through an interpreter they told us we were going to go over to our old army Camp Sham Shui Po and clean it up.  The Island had surrendered and this was where the prisoners were going to go.  In that Argyle camp we had a doctor, he had nothing to work with – no bandages or anything else.  All he had was the men’s field dressing kits that some of them still had.  Lieutenant McKillop died there toward the end of December and Earl Till died about the 15th of January – loss of blood there was nothing the doctor could do for him.  In the meantime we had gone over to Camp Sham Shui Po, I couldn’t believe what had happened to that camp when we saw it.  Let alone the plumbing even the window frames were gone, they took everything out of it there was nothing left.  Just a shell and the cement floor, the rock brick walls and the roof.  The Chinese had moved in and just cleaned it out.  We cleaned up what we could, I forget the date, most of the Grenadiers and the Royal Scotts and the British troops ended up in Sham Shui Po early in January.  The Grenadiers were in Sham Shui Po  until the 26th of January – I know that date  and they moved us over to North Point and moved the Middlesex and those that weren’t British over to Sham Shui Po – they left the British Navy at North Point with us.  The Canadians were all together again.  That’s when difficulties started – difficulty in this sense Brigadier Holm by this time – we knew Lawson was dead, we found out and Colonel Holm of the Rifles was senior Colonel and I think the officers decision was that he would be the new Brigadier.  They handed down new orders, they got everything established – mind you lets put it this way, we were a bunch of rabble in that sense – unshaven, slovenly – we had nothing to shave with – the Brigadiers and the Rifles put out orders that we were to become soldiers again – we were to become disciplined – we were to shave as best as we could and keep ourselves clean.  That got some semblance of order in camp.  Now while some of the men didn’t like it – my personal opinion was that that was something that had to be done otherwise none of us would ever have come home had that not been done because we were just a bunch of rabble.  That got us straightened out.  But the other story – I can’t forgive some of our officers – the Grenadier officers I can speak for – of for what happened in North Point.  I’m not ashamed of relating this story, about them, even if some of them are still alive – I’m not ashamed of relating the story.  It wasn’t our Junior officers.  When Colonel Sutcliffe died in April of 1942 in North Point,  Major Trist, George Trist took over as commanding officer of the Grenadiers.  By this time the Japanese were paying all the Canadian officers the equivalent of Japanese rank.  If we were working we got paid 10 cents a day and we don’t begrudge the fact officers got paid, this isn’t the reason I feel this way, there was a commissary had come in and they could buy whatever they wanted in that commissary because they were being paid.  It was the other rations – Colonel Trist decided to set up an officers mess and I’ll put it this way, if there was any beef at all come into camp the Grenadiers got the water it was cooked in and some of our officers got sliced beef, and any number of our fellas will admit it but they are not all like me, they won’t speak out.  Sergeant Donnelly our Sergeant Cook was thrown out of the cook house because he didn’t agree with what Trist wanted and Trist put his own Sergeant Cook in there. Changed the cook house staff.

WHAT EFFECT DID THAT HAVE ON THE MORALE OF THE MEN?

Well we stayed disciplined but we were a hard disciplined bunch – it just made us that way.  We objected to it, in fact, in Tommy Forsyth’s diary, Tommy has one related area I can’t say it was the first of July 1942 or the first of August 1942 but Tom’s comment on that day was when he come in from work, the Royal Rifles got date pie tonight, I wonder what happened to our dates – we got date water to put on our rice.  We know what happened to our dates, the officers got ‘em.  And again I say I’m not afraid of speaking this – never have been.  But most of those senior officers are gone – all due respect to the lads and their descendents but I feel this is something that should have been told years ago but its never been put in any book.  Even Tom when he had his diary put into book form, wouldn’t broaden on it too much – but I’m not afraid to speak out. 

DID THAT CONTINUE, DID THE OFFICERS …

That continued the whole time we were in North Point.  When we went over to Sham Shui Po in September on or about the same date as in January – it was around the 26th of September we moved back to Sham Shui Po – They moved the Royal Scotts and Middlesex to Japan they were the one’s on the Lisbon Maru that I said earlier had been sunk.  They moved us back to Sham Shui Po and we had to set up our kitchens all over again.  By then the commissary that come in didn’t have that much in it that they wanted to buy but I have to go back to North Point, Colonel Crawford and our Doctors we didn’t have anything – Gray and Banfield went after the officers of both regiments to provide a mess fund, this was in July of 1942 – there was a large number of us suffering badly from dysentery, we lost a lot of weight – I weighed about 110 lbs.  To provide a little extra mess, now what that meant – they put a tent up and at noon hour those of us that were getting this extra got grooly rice with sometimes corned beef in it, but that helped save my life, I’m positive of that, and I thank Crawford and the Doctors for that happening.  Now there’s not many people remember that, but I do.  And Cliff Mathews in Winnipeg do because Cliff was another one in the tent, but anyone that was in that tent can remember it.  There were Rifles in it too but I can’t recall the one’s that were there.   Now we’re back to Sham Shui Po.  In the commissary the prices were such that the officers didn’t have the same amount but they still got some – mostly they could get cigarettes.  Cigarettes weren’t too expensive at that time.   The mess didn’t change that much but the officers mess was changed slightly but it continued on. 

NOW COMING BACK TO NORTH POINT MR. ATKINSON, WHAT WERE THE SANITARY CONDITIONS LIKE?

Well when we got there they were all working, we got there on the 26th of January.  I guess the Rifle people that could do it had everything fixed.  By the time we got there the toilets were flushing and everything else.  Now I would say what the Japanese had done had got the Chinese to repair the water mains that come into camp.  We had flush toilets and showers – cold water, no hot water.  The section we had in the Grenadiers was that way and I think the Rifles had one too.

WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THE RATIONS YOU MEN WOULD GET AT NORTH POINT

The which?

THE RATIONS, THE FOOD RATIONS.

Well it varied, most of it was – when I say rice, it could be a mixture of rice and barley or whatever but the rations was slim, we got a bowl of that cooked twice a day and green watery soup, as I said earlier sometimes we got a meat flavour and that was what the officers roast beef was cooked in.

SO GENERALLY SPEAKING, THIS DIET THAT YOU HAD WAS LARGELY RICE?

Largely a grain type diet, yes.

SO, THERE WOULD BE 2 CUPS OR SO A DAY OF IT?

Yes.

NOW ON THAT DIET THE MEN LOST WEIGHT, YOU MENTIONED THIS ALREADY.

Oh yea, when I was taken prisoner I weighed about 170 lbs and after dysentery when I was in that mess tent, I weighed 110 lbs.

WITH THE WEIGHT LOSS AND DYSENTERY WAS THERE OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS DEVELOPING AMONG THE MEN?

Well we developed what we call Hong Kong Feet – Electric Feet.  Its from beriberi – the cords at the back of the ankle tighten and young Dubie – Dubie lives at the coast for a long time – when he walked he couldn’t bend his ankles, he lost all that power – he walked sort of flat footed like a clobber.   His feet never improved.  A lot of us I guess we still had Electric Feet but while that condition cleared up with wet beriberi it was still there. 

WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THE GUARDS THAT WERE THERE AT NORTH POINT?

Not that much, we had an electric fence put around the camp.  I can recall one instance them going after a young Chinese couple walking down the street where the rail way tracks were, they brought them both in and tied them up to a post and eventually killed them both.  The Japanese guard house was in the Rifle section and I can remember some of the Rifles I knew relating how they could hear the Chinese girl all night long, I guess the Japanese were raping her - but they were both dead the next morning.  They bayoneted them. And what ever they wanted with the China man, they used him for bayonet practice but prior to that they used him for Jujitsu practice – throwing them around and then tying them to the post. 

THIS WAS ALL DONE IN PLAIN VIEW OF THE PRISONERS?

Oh yea, sure, sure. Not in plain view of the Grenadiers because we could see it happening because we were down at the parade square – what was called the parade square at one end of the camp, in fact , no I haven’t got the picture here with me, the Rifles were at the end that had the gate – the guard gate and the Guard House.  

WITH THE MOVEMENT OF THE BRITISH POWS TO JAPAN, SHAM SHUI PO WAS NOW OPEN FOR THE CANADIANS TO BE MOVED.

Well they moved us all back to Sham Shui Po to keep us all together, there was no one left at North Point.  When we got over there most of the British officers were moved to Argyle – they had separated them because they got control of the men away from the senior officers, that was one of the reasons.  And eventually they took some of our senior Canadian officers over to Argyle too.  But after we left to go to Japan they came back to Sham Shui Po but after the Royal Scotts and Middlesex had moved out the camp was made smaller, they confined it to a smaller area. 

ONE THING THAT OCCURS TO ME MR. ATKINSON IS RELATED TO THE OFFICERS, DID THE MEN HAVE ANY DIRECT CONTACT WITH SENIOR OFFICERS AT EITHER CAMP?

No very little unless you were up on orders, and boy, I took a sheaf of standing orders to the war museum in 1986, Bob Boyd was our order clerk staff person, and Bob brought home with him – how he kept them all those years , I don’t know – but standing orders not completed - December 1941 from the 4th or 5th of ‘41 to January ’43 when he was moved to Japan, he carried those to Japan and back to Canada.  He was in Deer Lodge Hospital and I was up visiting him and he told me what he had, and he said “I don’t know what to do with them” – he was single with no relatives. I said well what should happen is that they should go to the museum.  I said “I’m going down on a trip to Ottawa, if you want I’ll take them down”.  And that’s where they ended up.  Richard Mallot was the curator at that time and he photocopied them and sent me a copy and I still have a copy.  But the originals have all been preserved in the War Museum but not in the War Museum as such but in the warehouse.

SO THESE STANDING ORDERS WOULD BE GIVEN BY THE SENIOR OFFICERS

Oh yea, by Colonel Trist and in there you’ll see a large number of promotions, a large number of demotions, a large number of dockage of pays of men, confined to barracks – different offences that were committed or supposedly committed and sentenced for.  But none of the dockage of pay or that nature happened when we came home. 

WHERE THERE ACTUALLY COURTS OF INQUIRY SET UP FOR BREACHES WHILE YOU WERE AT CAMP?

Oh no, no, no what would happen you would go before the Commander the same as when we were in the army, you were paraded before your commanding officer and sentenced – that’s what would happen.  Maybe for stealing somebody’s something or swearing at an officer or something of that nature.  They received a sentence for it. 

SO THAT STILL CONTINUED WHILE YOU WERE IN THE CAMP?

Oh yea, well again that was part of the discipline that Sutcliffe started before he died – in other words, that was necessary.  Some of the demotions and promotions that happened in Colonel Trist’s time after Sutcliffe died, were, as far as I’m concerned, not – I won’t say needless – but unnecessary.  And some of the promotions he put through after we came home were carried through on,  some of those fellas were promoted lance corporals and corporals and never got paid for it when they come home. 

AT SHAM SHUI PO, DID THE FOOD RATIONS IMPROVE FROM NORTH POINT.

Not to any great extent, no, pretty well the same.  The only thing that improved was if we went out to work in those years, you got an extra bun.  In order to get that extra bun a lot of us that shouldn’t have gone out to work,  went out to work.

In fact at SHAM SHUI PO, you were expected to work?

 Oh yea it was different than North Point at Sham Shui Po, we had to have so many men go out to work even if it was on a stretcher.

WHAT TYPE OF WORK WAS IT?

Well by the time I got out to work they had finished building the runway and we were cutting down a hill , they wanted to extend the airport into this hill and the Chinese ceremonial cemetery hill and they couldn’t get the Chinese to work on it because it was full of people’s burial vaults.  And we started with little carts on a narrow gauge railway – a 4 wheel cart, we loaded it up and shoveled dirt into it and pushed it down to the end and dumped it.  As we got the hill cut down and further out the slope got steeper and longer and at the end of it it had blocks to stop the cart and we were supposed to have it go down under control well 4 men pushing the cart and holding it back, sometimes it would slip unnecessarily and we let the cart go and it hit the bottom and dump it.   But our officers didn’t work.   And I’ll always remember Len Corrigan , Lieutenant Corrigan from Swift Current , he removed his officer’s designation and he and Blackwood and a couple of others dressed as privates and always went to work.  I was in his work gang one day and he said “look, you fellas that don’t feel like it, sit and rest, you watch for the guard coming around the curve”, and whenever the guards started, they would call and we would get back to work.   But Corrigan did most of the shoveling in that cart.  He was a damn good officer.  He was a re-enforcement officer – he joined us when we came back from Jamaica. 

HOW MANY HOURS WOULD YOU WORK ON THE Kai Tak AIRPORT?

Well recollection wise we would get up at 5-530 and have breakfast – a bowl of rice and a way down to the Ferry and away around the harbor to Kai Tak and work, we would be back at camp at 6:30, 7:00 at night have your supper and go to bed.  And you’re up the next morning.

SO SOMEWHERE BETWEEN 8 AND 10 HOURS?

Yea, oh yea – I won’t say all work but you were up to work for 8-10 hours a day.

YOU WOULD HAVE THE BOWL OF RICE YOU MENTIONED EARLIER?

Yes they would wake you up with a green soup or stew whatever it was that day.

AND THEN THE LUNCH TIME?

We had a bun.

AND AT THE END OF THE DAY?

Another bowl of rice or grain and green horror again.

SO GIVEN THAT DIET THAT YOU WOULD GET DURING A NORMAL DAY AND 8 OR 10 HOURS DOING MANUAL LABOUR, WHAT EFFECT DID THAT HAVE ON THE HEALTH OF THE MEN?

Well with a lot of us it was hard, but I’ll put it this way, my system seemed to lose all that weight and go down to a point of where I won’t say what I was getting was enough nourishment but I didn’t lose any more weight and I was able to continue on.  My body didn’t seem to need the same amount.  That’s the way it looked, or seemed.

BUT DURING THIS TIME MOST OF THE MEN OR MANY OF THE MEN HAD DYSENTERY OR DIARRHEA.

Oh yea well anybody with dysentery, even myself, out there working, you were going around the curve 5 or 6 times a day to relive yourself because all it was, was mucus you were passing – that’s all.

WHAT OTHER DISEASES WERE DEVELOPING AMONG THE MEN AT THIS TIME?

Well even before we left North Point, diphtheria has broken out, we had 2 or 3 men go up Bowen Road with diphtheria when we moved to Camp Sham Shui Po diphtheria was in full swing.  And another time that my life was saved about the middle of Oct I didn’t work at the Kai Tek that long.  About the middle of October we came in one night and Sergeant Major Caldwell called me down to his room at the end and said I want you to volunteer at the diphtheria hospital.  You know what I said, No way, I’m getting an extra bun out of work and he said if you don’t volunteer I’m going to volunteer your name anyway.  And I went.  Again, I always thank Bert Caldwell and still today, if I had not gone over there to the Diphtheria Hospital to work as an orderly I might not have survived working.  I ended up getting diphtheria about the middle of Dec but luckily enough for me there was enough toxin in and mine was a mild case.  Captain Gray ordered a shot of toxin and that saved my life.  As I said earlier I always thank Bert Caldwell after that because had he not taken me off the work party I might not have survived.  I worked in that hospital until I took diphtheria and then when my case was gone, the diphtheria cleared up.   I worked in the hospital until the end of it, until they closed the diphtheria hospital up.  There were no more fresh cases.

Tell me Mr. Atkinson, during that time, how many men died because of the diphtheria epidemic? 

Oh, you’ve got me - I would estimate 60 – 70 men died from diphtheria.  A large number died because of dysentery at the same time.  Now I worked in the diphtheria ward hospital – Jubilee Building, and we had a dysentery ward and I worked the night shift with Ron Clarecoats, Larry Furlotte and Pat Pourier – we were the night shift in that Hospital.  But Clarecoats and I had the dysentery ward itself and we had the one we liked.  We had fellas in there with dysentery and diphtheria at the same time and one I remember was Grenadier Foxall – we had to help feed them – and he needed the bedpan all night – we put him on the bed pan and finished feeding him.  Usually they would feebly call when they finished – and maybe my fault – I didn’t get back in soon enough - but it didn’t matter anyway, we went to check, he had died sitting on the bedpan.  Those are things you never forget.

Tell me Mr. Atkinson, were there proper medical facilities and treatments available for the men?

No, very few drugs and I don’t even know how the first toxin got into camp.  But I know the doctors did a tremendous job with what they could get.  This story I have is second hand one or two of the Japs had contacted gonorrhea or syphilis and wanted our doctors to fix them up because that was a real detriment on the Japanese army and by fixing the Japanese up supposedly we got some drugs and we can thank Crawford and the doctors for that.  The drugs were in the colony but the Japanese wouldn’t provide them – the anti-toxin was in the colony.

WOULD IT BE YOUR ASSESSMENT THAT WITH THE PROPER MEDICAL CARE AND PROPER FOOD THESE MEN WOULD NOT HAVE DIED.

A large, large number wouldn’t have died.  It’s a theory I have knowing the figures,  We had – we’ll put our people into three groups – we had young single men some of them as young as 16 even up to 30 that were single.  We had a group of married men from the age of – some as low as 20 – not that many with kids but from 25 – 40 that had young families back home and we had the older group some of them upwards into their 60’s in the Grenadiers that were married but their families were all grown up.  Now out of that group – my thinking is the largest group of deaths stemmed in that married group of 21 to 40 who had young families at home.  Those things they were thinking about when they were sick – ‘am I going to get home and see them’.  All I had at home was my mother and step-father and sisters.  I didn’t have the same worries my brother had.  He was married with a family.  He died in camp.  Walt Fryatt died in Bowan Road Hospital, Sergeant Fryatt – he was from Brandon – a First World War Vet.  Walt died from, how can I put it, I won’t say loneliness but the fact he was away from his family and didn’t think he would ever make it home.  A large number in that age group.

SO THE PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS

Psychological factors – it’s my thinking – had a lot to do with it.  And if they checked it out I think they might find was right. 

DURING THOSE AWFUL MONTHS OF WHEN THE DIPHTHERIA EPIDEMIC WAS IN FULL FLIGHT, THERE WERE OTHER DISEASES ALSO.

Oh yes, dysentery, hot foot, electric feet, everything we had it all.  Pellagra sores – what the diphtheria did was open up an isolation area in camp.  People that were carriers but would never develop diphtheria – my brother was one of them – were put in isolation.  And I guess that’s how I ended up getting diphtheria, we weren’t supposed to but I was going over and visiting my brother every other day in isolation and I guess that’s when I got it.  I didn’t get it from patients in hospital I got it in the isolation ward.  My brother and I decided that when the draft left for Japan in 1943 in January, we decided on the next draft to Japan we were going to go together. 

WHY?

Well I won’t say a change is as good as a rest but conditions might be different.   In July of 1943 my brother ended up going to Bowen Road  Hospital, he had diagnosed a mastoid – ear and he went in the hospital and I never saw him again.  We wrote a couple of notes back and forth that were smuggled.  He died on the 5th of October 1943 – I was in Japan and the doctors tried every which way to get me into the wards working again as an orderly but there was so many men that had to go and I could walk across the 50 yard parade square and didn’t stumble so I had to go to Japan.

Is that how they chose men?

They lined us up and got us to walk, and anyone who couldn’t walk was pulled from the line.  It was slow elimination and that’s the way I ended up going to Japan.

TELL ME ABOUT THE VOYAGE TO JAPAN.

We were on a – I called it a Tramp Steamer – our front hold had about 300 men in it, the back hold the same number.  Our front hold was all Grenadiers and Rifles – Canadians.  The back hold was a combination of Canadians and some British.  We got into ours and it was a calver and over in one corner of the bunker we were in there was some coal.  If you climbed up on the coal you kept sliding down.  We would sit on the floor and the fella behind you – what you were sitting with your knees against someone’s back.  There was no place to lay down.  That’s the way we traveled – we traveled that way from the 15th of August for 3 days to Tai Pai at Taiwan Formosa and we were in the Port Formosa – Tai Pai – for almost 10 days.  But every night on the trip they closed the hatch.  And while we were in Tai Pai they left the hatch open and put a canvas funnel down to get some air – it was stifling.   The only break we got was 10 men to go up to the can and it was a place built on the side of the ship where you sat on it and let go.  Some people with dysentery did that and there was a can put at the bottom of the stairs that was empty.  It was in continual use, and when it was filled up someone would carry it up and dump it.  When we left camp they gave us a number of buns for food.  As time went on they got pretty moldy.  Even if you cut the mold off they were un-edible – you couldn’t eat them.  But by this time they were cooking some rice and a stew mixture of some kind – very un-palatable.  In some cases it was fish cooked but still raw.  We were in Tai Pai for like I said, 10 days.  The only break we got was we got up on deck maybe twice a day in groups for a break & to go to the can.  They brought on board a fruit called a pomelo – it’s about 3 times the size of a grapefruit  and the flesh in it is like grapefruit flesh – strips but much larger.  It was sweet but very coarse.  That was something different.  Anybody with bad lips it burned if your lips were cracked the acid just made them raw.  When that happened diarrhea happened and the cans were in steady use all day long.  Then we left there and we landed in Osaka.  I guess what they were waiting for was enough ships for a convoy.  We stayed close to the China coast all the way then snuck across the lower part of the Sea of Japan and into Osaka.  The dates – I can’t tell you the exact dates – it would be near the second or third of September 1943.  They lined us up and split us up into 2 groups – our group ended up going to Niigata.  We were almost an overnight train ride and that’s when – we had done a lot of labour – but that’s when slave labour really started. 

WHEN YOU GOT TO NIIGATA WHAT WAS THE NAME OF THE CAMP?

We were in Camp 5B we found the Canadians were split up in Founder Gang, Coal Yard Gang, Shitutsu Gang, Reinko Coal Yard Gang and the Mirasu Dock Yard Gang.  Our Dock Yard Gang was 50 men.  Stevedores’. Luckily enough again another part that actually saved my life.  The Coal Yard Gang was – oh there had to be 150 men in the Coal Yard Gang and the balance of the three-hundred odd were in the Founders.  I can only relate little instances of the other two but the Dock Yard Gang – I’m an experienced Stevedore and an experienced thief – we handled food and everything else and we stole our share and we got our beatings for stealing when you got caught but we got away with a hell of a lot more than we got caught with.  One thing I would give an old Japanese credit for – his name was Sibiason – we called him Seabiscuit.  He had British declarations from First World War because the Japanese were allies with them at that time.  He was proud of those but as he always told us he was Japanese and his country was at war and that’s why he had to be the way he was.  We lost the cup when we had Sibiason – but that’s another story.  When he left anytime a bean load would come in they would steal a bag of beans down to our mess shack because they told us if we were going to carry 90 kilo bags of soybeans from the dock into the box car we had to them.  Those of us who survived the Dock Yard Gang everyday at noon the little ration of rice we got from camp – we got a powdered milk can full of cooked soybeans in fact, they were so good that Sibiason put one of our men in there as a permanent cook in the little mess shack – and I think that maybe that’s why I am the way I am today.  The amount of protein we got out of the soybeans at that time, and I can’t tell you how many people from the Niiagata Dock Yard are still alive – I think there are more of us than any of them.  That was a tough camp.  There are 137 graves in Tokyo.  Two of them are an Air Force and a Navy man that died near the end of the war.  The other 135 are Canadians that have died in prison camps in Japan.  74 of them come from Niigata.

HOW WOULD MANY OF THOSE MEN DIE?

Lack of medicine, lack of treatment, beatings, slave labour, diet  - that’s the only way I can put it.

AT 5B CAN YOU TELL ME IF THE RATIONS IMPROVED AS YOU HAD HOPED?

No, never.  I’m going to relate one incident – December 31, 1943  -January 1, 1944 one of the huts we were in collapsed.  They use no nails in the building of their super structures – they use a square hole and a square peg.  The camp was built on the side of a sand hill.  All they used for a foundation for footings was a rock and they would put a six inch log on it to hold up the big 18” center beam.  By this time Americans had come into camp.  The Canadians were on one side and the Americans on the other.  We were sleeping in double deckers, we had a mud floor.  I always say it was a dream but reality was crushing wood.  I woke up and all I could hear was rumbling crushing crackling wood and we’d been working on applies and oranges that day – I don’t think I can recollect – the stack was collapsing and this was the crushing lumber.  All of a sudden I got hit and that’s the last I remember.  First thing when I come to was Matt Hawes, Ed Arseneau and Walter Jenkins trying to lift the timber off of me and a couple of fellas next to me, but they finally got a saw and cut it and they could lift it.  I had my pelvis crushed – there were six of us with crushed pelvises.  We lost 8 men that were killed by that same beam.  They all had crushed chests.  We slept with our heads to the wall that night.  There was Atkinson, Dame, Tex Hicks, Jerry Maberly, Ray Pellor – who the hell was the other one – I have a list of them all – we all had crushed pelvises – Joe Gurski was the other one.   Three of them were put into casts and three of us they couldn’t find any breaks when they used the – I forget the term – radio something – X-ray that they used.  They couldn’t find any breaks in me but when I come home I found out both pelvis bones had been crushed.  8 men were killed and 6 of us that way, that was January 1, 1944 and I was laying on my back with my knees propped up on a straw sack till March and an American Doctor that the Japs come up from Tokyo had brought in come in and told us if we didn’t get up and get our legs straight and start walking, we would never walk again.  They pulled the gunny sack out and my legs collapsed and I couldn’t move them.  I rolled over and crawled over to the door – the barrack end of it was built up about 2 feet and the floor was mud and along one wall was like a railing and I finally got the courage up and I stood up and held the hand rail and tried to walk but I couldn’t do it.  But every morning, twice a day I would get up and do that and in a couple of weeks I was walking with a couple of sticks.  By the end of March I was back in my old Niigata Dock Yard Gang – I was back working.  Since coming home, in 1990 I had my left hip done, and in 1995 I had my right hip done.  It took me from the time we come home until 1989 to get a pension from my hips.  In 1956 – I’ve got my own file - the radiologist at Deer Lodge, his recommendations to the doctor was that the bony protrusion on my right pelvic bone – which is just like your knuckles - was no doubt due to childhood malnutrition.  I didn’t see that for years, but I finally gathered information out of my own file  - I have my own file on myself.  If he’d still been working I would have went and hit him on the head (laughter) – because they were my hips and I knew what happened.  All you had to do was feel it but it was where it was crushed and it nipped just this way – here’s where the pelvic bone is a curve, mine nipped just that way, it was just like your knuckles.  It injured my spine, Charlottetown for years, the medical advisors down there would put in a report that a spine can’t be injured by a horizontal blow it has to be a vertical blow.  My orthopedic doctor – I won’t use the terms what he said – my lower spine, the lumbar area of my spine was severely damaged when I had my pelvis crushed.  He said I can’t believe a doctor would look at it that way if he had read the story about what happened.  But anyway, its all water under the bridge.  I’m here and I’m alive and I fight all pension and welfare cases  for vets and I enjoy doing it.  Don’t ask me about anything else- I know pensions and welfare – I can’t tell you what happened yesterday, I can’t tell you his name – but I know enough about pensions and welfare to fight.

LET’S GO BACK TO NIIGATA 5B CAMP.

Sorry I’ve been rambling.

NO, NOT AT ALL – NOT AT ALL.  WHAT DO YOU RECALL ABOUT THE GUARDS THERE?

They were tough.

When you say tough, how would you characterize them - were they tougher than they were at Sham Shui Po?

Oh yea, the senior guard, the senior  NCO’s – some of the honcho’s as we called them – the civilians would come and take us out to work we had one guy, he had various names -  Pistol Pete, Cyclone Pete – his Japanese name escapes me but he was a Sergeant Major I think, under our camp commandant he stayed in the camp and one night we came in from work, this was in 1945 and Tappy Richards an Englishman that come up from Tokyo that came into our camp, a number of them come up.  We were at three ranks and when we come in – Cyclone Pete had gone to Tokyo the day before and when he was on duty we all were searched when we come in from work.  He was away so we figured we were safe, we each had a loot bag of raw soybeans.  We got in and lined up to bango [number off] for roll call and who out of the office comes but Cyclone Pete.  He got up on his little mound – he was so short he had a little mound so he could look over the men.  We knew what was going to happen.  He had a fella with him.  We opened up our ranks and the guards searched us.  When the guard come down our rank , I took my mess kit cup out and held it out in front and pushed the haversack behind me and put my jacket on my shoulder and Taffy Richards was in the line behind me – well when the guards searched his bag and found the soybeans – he said “what’s this you S.O.B.” and he backed up and when he backed up he hit me and my jacket fell off when the guard was searching the guy next to me and he pulled my haversack around and pulled my loot out.  Well, I say now we looked at Cyclone Pete and he was clapping because here he was going to show his friend from Tokyo how he handled prisoners of war.  They dismissed the men – they never searched the rest of them – once they caught us that’s all they wanted.  He stood us at attention and went to work on Tappy Richards first.  As I say I was lucky in that sense – with his fists.  We stood there and took it.  If you fell to the ground, they took the boots to you so you braced yourself and took those blows.  Then he went and got some black ink or paint – whatever they used to do their writing with and in Japanese characters he wrote “STEALERS” on our foreheads and we stood at attention in front of the guard house all night long.  The only break we got – we learned this from other fellas – you called the guards and said you had to go to the can.  You had to run.  The guard would come behind you with his gun, his bayonet – you would do your job come back and stand at attention again.  This was the only break you got.  The Dock Yard Gang came out the next morning to go to work and we figured, oh we will stay by the guard house – nope – line up.  We lined up, marched out to work – no breakfast – went to work and when we got out there, Matt Hawes learned to speak Japanese pretty good – he was one of our Sergeants and thank God he did, he saved us a lot over there.  Like the time we were in Japan.  Sibiason looked at our foreheads and saw “stealers” and he said “Matt what happened” and Matt told him we had been caught stealing soybeans and old Sibiason laughed, you know what he did, he told Richards and I to go in the mess shack and go to sleep.  Matt told him we hadn’t had any breakfast and had been up all night so that’s why I say Sibiason was a good guard, a good civilian but Cyclone Pete or Pistol Pete, whatever you want to call him , if I ever had the chance again after we were liberated – he disappeared he took off. So did the Camp Commandant- they took off from camp.

THIS WAS AN INCIDENT THAT HAPPENED TO YOU MR. ATKINSON, WERE YOU WITNESS TO ANY OTHERS?

I can’t remember the young Middlesex man’s name but he was one that come up from Tokyo to join and one day at work he decided that he wasn’t going to work for the Japanese anymore.  And he just sat down.  Now the guards didn’t beat him or the civilians didn’t beat him but when he got back to camp that night that S.O.B. Camp Commandant that we had come out and he went after him with his sward scabbard and he beat him severely in fact he started to put the boots to him.  Captain Parker the American Officer under Major Fellows come running out and he actually pushed the Camp Commandant away and told him to leave him alone and then he went to work on Parker but Parker didn’t fall down.  But that saved that kid, I’m sure, saved his life.  We had beatings, we had where one of them would be in the dark and when you went to the can, they would slug you with their rifle butt – It never happened to me but it did happen to other individuals.  They would relish coming into the hut, even if we were eating, and if you didn’t stand at attention and give them a salute you could get banged around, that’s what it amounted to.  That’s the regular guards.

IS IT FAIR TO SAY THAT WHENEVER THE REGULAR JAPANESE GUARDS WERE AROUND YOU MEN WERE ALWAYS WARY and alert?

Oh very, very.  We were alert all the time, not so much the guards but out in the dock yard, the Dock Yard Gang we had one man, Japanese civilian was called the Shadow because he was almost six foot tall, wore a black cape and he wore a black hat.  You don’t remember The Shadow Magazine, you’re too young, but in those years one of the popular magazines was The Shadow.  Lamont Cranston, it used to be a radio show – The Shadow Knows.  That was his name.  Another man looked like Henry Morgan the movie actor and we called him Uncle Henry.  Sibiason was the Shadow and unknown to us he knew a little English.  It took us a long time to find that out.  He was in charge of the gang working in the warehouse and somebody was in stealing something.  Someone would stand at the warehouse door and say “The Shadow Knows” and they would give it up and, hide their loot bag,  come back out or they would say “hello Uncle Henry” – these were signals to anybody who was stealing and filling up loot bags for the boys.

YOU WERE JUST TALKING ABOUT THE VARIOUS MEANS OF ALERTING PEOPLE THAT THE JAPANESE WERE ABOUT, WAS IT FAIRLY COMMON THE TYPE OF PILFERING YOU WERE ENGAGED IN?

The Dock Yard Gang yes, that’s another reason that maybe I’m in the condition I’m in today – any of our Dock Yard Gang who are alive today are in, I won’t say reasonably good health, but we’re more active that some of the others.  I can give you another instance.  I mentioned young Dube earlier.  Dube as I said had problem walking and the Japs used to kid him but again this Shadow was in charge of our group.  There were six of us, Bob McLeod, Pete Reisdorf, Dube , Mike Frieson, and Joe Skwarok and myself. We went down to this one warehouse and we had to load these jute bags that was tied in bundles about so high into a box car.  Well when we got into any warehouse we had to find out what it was.  Dube wasn’t always too well so we put him in behind the stack to find out what was in the warehouse.  The Shadow was away and we were working and he come out and said “those bags have sugar in the corners”.  So he stayed there all day opening up bundles before we got to them taking the wet sugar out of the corners and putting it into our loot bags.  We worked in there for two days.  The Shadow would come along and say “nothing Dube, nothing Dube” – Dube had gone to the can because he had constant diarrhea and dysentery.  Well most of the bags that went into the 2nd day’s cars were cleaned out of any sugar that was in the corners.  We got that back safely into camp and even the fellas in the hospital benefited by some of it.  Most everyone in our Dock Yard Gang got it, not the Americans they had their own area to cover.  The Canadians shared in it and a large amount of it went over to the hospital to Walt Campbell and Dr. Stewart for the patients.  Now it was dirty but it was still sugar.  We had to work it that way

MR ATKINSON, GIVEN YOUR DESCRIPTION OF THE CONDITIONS THERE AT NIGATA, THE HARD WORK, THE LACK OF PROPER DIET, the INADEQUATE MEDICAL CARE AVAILABLE, AND THE LACK OF KNOWLEDGE FROM THE OUTSIDE WORLD, DID YOU MEN HAVE TROUBLE KEEPING YOUR MORALE UP?

Some did, and if they did they didn’t come home.  I had a theory then and I live by that same theory today.  I don’t worry about next week, next month or next year.  I live today so I can eat today so I will wake up tomorrow.  I’ve lived that way all my life ever since prison camp.

IF YOU SAW IN THE CAMP A MAN STARTING TO GET DEPRESSED OR DESPONDENT WHAT WOULD THE REST OF YOU MEN DO?

We would try to change his thinking by talking to him, making a friend of him, or make him not feel so lonely or whatever.  But as I said earlier those of them that got into the depressed state, very few of them came home.  That 5B camp, I won’t say most, but a lot of those deaths were due to that fact.  They were sick, they could get no medicine, they had to slave labour, and in some cases it did affect them from that point. 

LOOKING BACK ON THAT TIME WAS THERE QUESTION IN ANYONE’S MIND THAT YOU WERE eventually GOING TO BE LIBERATED?

Well at some times we wondered.  As more B29s appeared in the sky we knew the end was coming.  But we didn’t expect it, we figured it would be by Christmas but not when it happened on the 14th of August.

WERE YOU TOLD BY THE JAPANESE WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO YOU?

There are various stories about Niigata and 5B.  My recollection, we went out to work on the morning of the 14th to the Dock Yards.  Just after lunch 2 guards come out and said ‘situawari’ – we went back into camp because we got to rest because are going to carry firewood in from the hill beyond the camp.  The sick fellas were cutting firewood.  Back we go.  The next morning we get up and we’re carrying in logs and my recollection of it is the guards were friendly they said ‘situawari’ and we would laugh  and we would say ya, ‘situawari America #1, America Itchibon’ and they would say ‘hei’ yes America itchibon.  This went on so long, somebody went over and told Ransom and Major Fellows the American Officer in charge of the Camp and they went over to the Camp Commandant’s office and he said “yes, the fighting’s stopped.  Well the fellas took over the Camp right there and then.  Disarmed the guards, he left them with their rifles but no bayonets and no ammunition.  The Camp Commandant, didn’t tell us about the bombs. He felt the civilians might take retribution against the City and he wanted the guards left with their rifles.  Well, within 2 days even the rifles and the guards were gone.  We took over the City of Niigata – the area that we knew.

WAS THERE ANY RETRIBUTION TAKEN BY ANY OF THE PRISONERS?

Not on civilians no, there’s varied stories about what happened to Holy Joe, to Wiskers but those 2 stories are untrue. If you talk to the Americans it was supposedly committed but it didn’t happen.  One story is they pulled Wisker’s beard out by the roots and Holy Joe they gave him cement shoes and threw him in the harbour -  but both of them were up on war crimes but I told you about Cyclone Pete – Pistol Pete, we had a Yank by the name of – damn his name will come to me – a fighter a good fighter and we were marched down to the train and Cyclone Pete was going along wishing everyone a happy voyage and shaking hands and Smokey hauled off and whacked him in the chops and knocked him out, he said I’ve wanted to do that for two years, he finally got his wish – knocked him out cold.  Smokey was a boxer in peace time.  But the other two, no.  We had no – our elation at being released was so great, we had no direct need or animosity toward any of them.  The only one I did have was Tobiason beat me up at work and ended up going into the army, I think the Camp Commandant at the time got rid of him for the beating I took from him.  I didn’t mention that.  But if we had ever gone back to Japan or he’d been around I don’t know what would have happened.  I would like to go back in later years and find him and laugh in his face.  But that’s about all.

TELL ME NOW MR. ATKINSON ABOUT THAT INCIDENT.

Well there was a foundry across the canal where our mess shack was and we had a little narrow gauge railway with little cars on it and periodically the train would move in a couple of box cars and be loaded with a white – I called it toxic soda – it was a white compound that’s used in the foundry for smelting.  We had to shovel that into the little cars to put on the barge that would go across the canal on the cable.  It couldn’t get wet, it had to stay dry.  Tobiason looked up at the sky, its July its going to rain and he called for a tarpo.  He got Matt Hawes up at one end of the four cars and me on the other and I went the wrong way.  He cursed me in Japanese they can’t pronounce Ds and sometimes other letters and  my name was Haro that’s what I had on me in Japanese characters.  He said “Haro come here” – I have a wooden sword, an exact copy of what he used – he whacked me on the head on the cheeks on the shoulders then he struck me in the stomach with it.  It wasn’t a real sword – its wooden one. One they use for kendo.  I went out – passed out and when I come around we finished work for the day and going in that night and Matt called me up to the front rank with him and said “what are you going to do “ and I said “what do you mean” he said, “you know what the new Camp Commandant said that if we were mistreated at work, he wanted to know”.  I said “I don’t know”  I said, “I’m leery” – I didn’t want another beating.  Anyway, we got into camp after supper Matt went over and told Art France, the interpreter, and Major Fellows and they went over to see Camp Commandant.  Matt related the story to them.  They come over and got me.  I went over and told the same story Matt told.  Well within 2 weeks Tobiason was gone – the Army called him up.  He was young enough to go into the Army.  Now I don’t know whether that beating he gave me or what the Camp Commandant said that if we were mistreated he wanted to know, if that had any affect on him or not.   It may have been his time to be called up – but he disappeared, he was gone.

COMING BACK TO THE END OF THE WAR YOU DESCRIBED THE FEELING AMOUNGST THE PRISONERS WITH THE WAR ENDING HOW LONG WAS IT BEFORE YOU WERE ACTUALLY MOVED OUT?

Well we knew the war was over officially on the 15th.  Within 3 hours that day, little dive bombers off the aircraft carriers and dropped hammocks loaded with all things, condoms (laughter), cigarettes, they cleaned the commissary out, notes telling us B29s would be over within a day or two and then they come over loaded with oil drums welded together with wooden plugs in the end orange coloured parachutes to drop them.  We lived the life of kings from then until we left Niigata about the 3rd or 4th of September.  We took over the town, we took over the camp we were all over the country side.  We went to Tokyo and Yokahama – they processed us on the docks.  We went through a warehouse, we had a medical, they sprayed us and we had a shower and they sprayed us again and they give us some clean clothes.  I had an American Marine outfit – green pants, green shirt, green jacket – everything and they put us on a LSV - landing ship vehicle USS Ozark. They had that loaded with beds all the way around and on the upper deck – more beds.  We were loaded with prisoners of war.  The next morning, the P.A. System come on “Now hear this, Now hear this” they called out 25 American names alphabetically and 10 Canadian names alphabetically – Atkinson 1A, 4Bc and 5C’s.  And right away I thought oh, we’re back in the Army here comes a fatigue job – and it said “pack your kits you’re leaving for the airport”.  I left Japan on the 6th or 7th of September and I was home in Winnipeg on the 16th of September.  Those 10 of us were the first Canadians to arrive home from Japan.  I’ve got pictures of our landing in Vancouver – the Lieutenant Governor the Mayor and all the dignitaries and officers and all the way across the country we had a great reception.  But I was the only one to stay in Winnipeg.  There were 3 Grenadiers and 7 Rifles, the two Grenadiers  were Bs, no A’s – Atkinson and Arseneau and Ernie Buck was the other Grenadier but both those 2 lived in New Brunswick and they stayed on the train and went home.  I was the only one – I have pictures of the arrival in Winnipeg.  Curiosity people wanting to see what prisoner of war looked like and that CPR rotunda train station, there were hundreds of people down there.  I can still hear the remarks  - I had gone from a measly 110 pounds when we were liberated or maybe a little bit more – maybe 115 from all those soybeans. When I arrived in Winnipeg I weighed 150 lbs.  And I can still hear the remarks going through the crowd “he doesn’t look too thin”  - (laughter) – I’ve got pictures on the train smoking a cigar and no it was a great trip home, and I’m sure glad my name started with an “A” - (laughter).

MR. ATKINSON, TELL ME WHEN YOU LOOK BACK ON YOUR EXPERIENCE THAT OF THE BATTLE OF HONG KONG AND THE Subsequent INCARCERATION OF ALMOST 4 YEARS, WHAT EFFECT DID THAT EXPERIENCE HAVE ON YOU IN LATER LIFE?

Oh a varied experience, I would say.  I got married and had a family of four – a boy and a girl a boy and a girl – a good family.  I say I had the pattern, I knew how to do it - (laughter).  My kids tell me I was a good father, even though I ended up drinking a lot.  They never wanted for anything.  That had no effect on me, I can’t say that that made me drink the way I drank I think it was the job I had that made me drink the way I did.  I gave that up.  I would get into, not depressed states, but at Christmas time every year, I would have to fight like hell to get into the Christmas spirit or New Year spirit.  My kids could never understand, I had to relate to them why I felt the way I did because my first Christmas overseas I was a Prisoner of War of the Japanese and as they got older and began to hear more they began to realize why I was that way.  I overcame that too – I still get a little melancholy around Christmas time, but I feel its only natural, a lot of people do.   But I feel I relate that to those four years of incarceration. 

HAVE YOU HAD OTHER PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS LIKE NIGHTMARES OF THAT TIME?

Oh I’ve had nightmares periodically but the last 10 years before I retired before I quit drinking I never had to worry about it because I was never sober.  I never had nightmares.  But that never bothered my work I was up every morning and worked all day.  But that’s another story.  But no, I have a problem with my feet sometimes and for a long time I couldn’t go to bed at night with my feet covered, I had to keep the covers off my feet.  And now, periodically they will jump which wakes me up.  But I don’t have any dreams anymore.  I’ve overcome that after all these years – I’ve overcome that. 

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE JAPANESE PEOPLE?

Well I put them into 3 classifications, we’ve got our Canadians born in Canada – Japanese Canadian so called.  I play golf with some of them in Winnipeg.  I feel sorry for what happened to them in Canada but there was a reason for why the Canadian Government moved them out.   The people in Japan there are two classifications, there is the old people and the government, and the young people who know nothing about what Japan did during the war.  My grudge is against the present Government of Japan, the Government of the day of Japan in the 1940s and the old people that knew what happened but won’t admit to the atrocity they committed or the things they did to us as Prisoners of War – not just Canadians but all Prisoners of War.

HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE CANADIAN GOVERNMENT THAT SENT YOU TO HONG KONG IN THE FIRST PLACE?

Well, I can relate my feeling that way, I was – I joined the Army I was a volunteer.  All of us were.  We joined the Army to go where our King or Country saw fit to send us.  It was our lot to be set to Hong Kong but there is no way, shape, or form that I feel my Government should have sent me knowingly – and they knew – to a spot where one of two things were going to happen – I’d be killed in action or be taken as Prisoner of War.  I’ve never forgiven them for that.  And for that, they owe me.  And they owe all our people that are left and if I’m successful in the next two years those that are under 100% disability; I hope to have them up to 100% pension.

THIS IS IN YOUR PRESENT JOB?

Yes, my present job.

AS BENEFITS OFFICER?

I may not live long enough, but I’m going to get most of it done.

WHEN YOU THINK BACK, MR. ATKINSON, ON THE MEN THAT YOU SERVED WITH THE YOUNG MEN LIKE YOURSELF WENT OFF TO DO WHAT THEIR COUNTRY WANTED THEM TO DO, WHEN YOU THINK BACK ON YOUR COLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE, WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT WHEN YOU THINK OF THOSE MEN?

Well I can explain it this way, I went to the Sisler High School in Winnipeg in 1986 – I was asked to go the day before Remembrance Day, and give them a talk about Hong Kong and the battle.  One part of it was visiting that cemetery at Sai Wan and I told them that I’m an old man now, but when I was over on that Pilgrimage in 1985, and walked down those steps to the Canadian Section and saw the names of my buddies on those tomb stones – as I told the kids some of them as young or younger than you – that died, killed in action or died in prison camps I said, that’s just the way it comes back to me.  I said its hard for you people to understand how I feel now or whatever, but I said those young men were just like you were here today.  That’s about the only way I can explain it. 

IF YOU HAD THE OPPORTUNITY OF SPEAKING TO YOUNG CANADIANS NOW ABOUT PATRIOTISM AND DUTY WHAT WOULD YOU SAY TO THEM?

Well that’s difficult because we have gone through a period – since the Second World War – how many decades – almost five, where we’ve had four different groups of age people where they have had no idea or no thought of war or anything else.  The only thing I can say to them is as I said to a young fella in 1995.  A press reporter – I think from the Toronto Star – he asked me a question that what I thought of the Army and I said from the sound of your voice you don’t like our system of National Defense and he said “no I don’t”  and I said well,  I’ll put it to you this way, its Thank God that there’s a lot of people in Canada that hasn’t got the same attitude you’ve got because if Canada ever had to go to war we would never have an army and would have a hell of an Army if we had to raise one with people like you.  That’s the way I put it.  I can’t remember just what his question was, but that was my answer to him. I feel that way today, I wouldn’t want to see another conflict no way shape or form but we do need an Armed Forces for different safeguards, and I would expect – as my son’s grew up I always told them that – they said how would you feel if another war come along and I said I would expect you to do the same thing I did – join and defend your country.  And that’s what I can tell young people today  - if a war did come the only way our Country can continue on the way it is now is by individuals like you and you and you joining up and defending it.  It’s the only way.  I don’t think we’ll ever have another war.  Not a war like the Second World War, there’s wars going on the wars never stop. 

MR ATKINSON I WANT YOU TO KNOW IT’S BEEN A GREAT HONOUR AND A PRIVILEGE TO HAVE SPOKEN WITH YOU THIS MORNING I WANT YOU TO KNOW SIR WE APPRECIATE VERY MUCH YOU TAKING THE TIME TO SHARE YOUR RECOLLECTIONS OF YOUR EXPERIENCE OF BOTH THE BATTLE OF HONG KONG AND THE TERRIBLE YEARS THAT FOLLOWED IN CAPTIVITY AT THE HANDS OF THE JAPANESE.  I WANT YOU TO KNOW SIR WE APPRECIATE VERY MUCH THIS SERVICE YOU HAVE GIVEN CANADA THEN AND WE APPRECIATE THE SERVICE YOU HAVE GIVEN TO US TODAY.    THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

Well I thank you Mr. Robinson, I thank you for the opportunity of doing it because what it means is those war experiences are going to be available for year after year to schools or anything else that want to learn something about Canada’s History – there’s not enough of that being done today and this is one means of providing that source.  So that’s why I’m more than happy to come here today.  But I hope I haven’t taken up all that time, I’ve taken up two men.  Thank you.

Transcrite par Linda King. L’entrevue a eu lieu en 1997. Présentée par sa fille, Lori Smith.

_________

Écoutez une autre entrevue effectuée par le Manitoba Museum of Man and Nature et lisez une autre entrevue sur ce site.


 

S’il vous plaît indiquer votre nom complet.

Harold Angus Martin Atkinson

Bonjour, monsieur Atkinson. Veuillez me dire votre lieu et date de naissance.

Je suis né à Selkirk, au Manitoba, le 14 février 1922.

Avez-vous obtenu votre formation scolaire primaire à Selkirk ?

J’ai fait mes 1ere, 2e et 3e années à Selkirk. Mon père est mort en 1931. Ma mère et moi sommes déménagés à Winnipeg et avons vécu tour à tour chez une sœur, puis l’autre. Elles étaient mariées et un peu plus âgées que moi. Ma mère se disputait avec l’une d’elles et nous devions ensuite aller vivre avec l’autre sœur, alors j’ai eu une petite enfance instable dans ce sens.

Qu’est-ce que votre père faisait dans la vie ?

A cette époque, il n’y avait pas de garde côtière. Ça relevait du gouvernement fédéral. Selkirk, au Manitoba, servait à l’époque de quartier général pour tous les bateaux lacustres qui remontaient le lac Winnipeg. Avant de mourir, mon père avait été contremaître de ce que nous appelons les chantiers gouvernementaux; c’était la cale sèche où on envoyait faire réparer les bateaux et tout le reste. Il venait de Baton, au Lincolnshire en Angleterre.

Était-il un ancien combattant ?

De la Première Guerre mondiale.

Vous souvenez-vous l’avoir entendu parler de son service ?

Mon père me parlait très peu souvent de sa vie; la seule chose dont je me souviens, c’est ce qu’il qualifiait de « moments heureux ». Lui et mon oncle John – le frère de ma mère –ont tous deux rejoint le 108e bataillon et l’ont suivi à l’étranger, et je pense qu’après ça, c’était un bataillon dispersé et il est parti renforcer d’autres fronts.

Alors que votre mère était le parent unique de votre famille, c’était l’époque de la Dépression. Quel impact ceci a-t-il eu sur votre enfance ?

Je ris aujourd’hui, quand les gens parlent de bien-être social. Les dollars n’ont pas la même valeur qu’alors, mais pendant une période de temps, ma mère et moi recevions le bien-être social – on appelait ça le secours. Je me rendais à l’édifice Cataman sur la rue Main [à Winnipeg], tous les vendredis pour aller chercher nos billets de secours. On nous donnait 5 $ par semaine pour l’épicerie et 2 $ par semaine pour le lait; ma mère disait toujours que je pouvais acheter un sac d’arachides, et j’avais l’habitude d’aller faire mes achats à l’épicerie libre-service d’Eaton sur l’avenue Portage.

Ce fut un temps difficile pour vous et votre mère. Que faisiez-vous après l’école ?

A cette époque, quand je parle de recevoir le bien-être social, nous vivions dans – disons que c’était presque un taudis. Nous avions deux chambres dans un immeuble et le jeune homme en bas, toute la famille en bas s’appelaient Riddock, et le jeune Reg s’est retrouvé chez les Grenadiers tout comme moi. Je ne l’ai pas vu avant mon arrivée en Jamaïque, mais à Winnipeg, nous vendions tous deux des journaux sur le coin de l’avenue Portage. Nous gagnions deux cents et demi pour chaque journal – le journal coûtait cinq cents et nous obtenions deux cents et demi. Reg avait le Free Press et j’avais la Tribune. Il se tenait sur un coin et je me tenais sur l’autre. Nous nous réunissions et nous partagions nos journaux pour avoir les deux à vendre. C’est comme ça qu’on s’arrangeait.

Quel niveau scolaire avez-vous atteint ?

C’est une longue histoire. J’ai terminé la 9e année et j’ai commencé en 10e année à St. John’s Tech. J’aimais jouer au football mais mes notes n’étaient pas assez bonnes pour jouer au football. Ma mère s’était mariée en 1935; mon beau-père était directeur du service des articles en porcelaine au magasin au détail Ashdowns, et il m’a donné un emploi là-bas. J’ai quitté l’école et je suis allé travailler pour 5 $ par semaine.

Que faisiez-vous à Ashdowns ?

La première année et demie, j’étais ce qu’on appelait « Buy Boy », un acheteur. Je prenais les commandes d’achat du service, je les faisais remplir par le grossiste d’Ashdown et ensuite elles étaient livrées au magasin. Puis je suis passé au service de la coutellerie et ensuite, au service de la forge comme vendeur. L’été de 1940, j’ai rencontré mon frère par inadvertance. J’avais décidé de m’engager et j’avais fini aux casernes de Fort Osborne, où j’ai vu mon frère. Il avait 11 ans de plus que moi et il avait décidé de s’engager. Je crois que nous avons tous deux pensé la même chose : que si nous ne nous étions pas engagés et portés volontaires pour nous battre pour notre pays, notre père, notre vieux père se serait retourné dans sa tombe, parce qu’il croyait absolument qu’il fallait défendre ses droits et son pays.

Aviez-vous vu votre frère très souvent avant cela ?

J’aurais dû mentionner que, jusqu’à ce que nous recevions le bien-être social, il avait vécu avec nous, mais il avait 11 ans de plus que moi et avait son métier. Il était boucher et il avait son propre emploi, et lui, comment dirais-je, lui et ma mère avaient l’habitude de s’affronter. Elle n’approuvait pas sa façon de faire les choses ou de vivre et il a décidé de déménager. Je ne le blâme pas. Ma mère était une bonne mère, mais elle était une femme dure et tenace. Elle a vécu jusqu’à l’âge de 87 ans.

Vous avez indiqué qu’elle s’était remariée en 1935. Vous n’aviez donc pas l’obligation financière de l’aider.

Oh non, il n’y avait aucune difficulté de ce côté, aucune. Bill Linklater, mon beau-père, était un excellent beau-père.

Vous avez indiqué que vous vous êtes enrôlé dans les forces terrestres de l’armée canadienne; pouvez-vous me dire pourquoi vous avez choisi celles-ci ?

Eh bien, j’avais plusieurs raisons. Le jeune détective du magasin Ashdowns – John Millen, si je me souviens; oui, John Millen – a décidé que nous allions rejoindre la Marine et nous sommes descendus à Sherbrooke et Ellis, où le NCSM Chippewa effectuait l’enrôlement. Et un scout/louveteau que je connaissais se rappelait le sémaphore et allait entrer dans le Corps de transmissions de la Marine, et on nous a dit « nous n’avons pas besoin de vous en ce moment, mais dans un mois ou deux, nous allons vous écrire et vous demander de revenir. » Et c’est comme ça que ça s’est passé. Je suis retourné à Ashdowns et j’en ai eu plein le casque et j’ai décidé d’aller à Fort Osborne entrer dans l’armée. Comme je l’ai mentionné, ça s’est adonné que mon frère était là le même jour. Je me suis engagé à deux reprises. J’ai passé l’examen médical – avec le vieux Docteur McTavish; je suis allé à l’école avec ses enfants. Donc, j’ai passé l’examen médical et nous nous sommes levés devant le sergent-major Kairns pour qu’il nous assermente. Il regarda mes documents et dit « vous n’avez que 18 ans » et il les déchira et dit « revenez dans quelques années, nous n’avons pas besoin de vous. » Et je suis retourné au travail. J’étais de retour la semaine suivante et j’ai croisé le vieux Docteur McTavish, qui a demandé : « Que faites-vous là encore, Atkinson ? » J’ai dit que j’avais 18 ans la semaine d’avant et 20 ans aujourd’hui, donc de svp remplir le formulaire. Les parents n’ont jamais rien dit, donc mon âge d’armée est de deux ans de plus que ce qu’il est réellement.

Du point d’enrôlement à Fort Osborne, où êtes-vous allé ensuite ?

Eh bien, à ce moment-là, aucune des unités à Winnipeg ne recrutaient ni n’ajoutaient à leurs effectifs, ou quoi que ce soit. À cette époque, le ministère fédéral de la défense nationale a commencé un programme de formation de 30 jours. Ils ont mobilisé les hommes entre les âges de, je crois que c’était 20 ou 21 ans et 30 ans, qui étaient célibataires, pour la formation d’un mois. J’avais été dans la milice MPMA et j’ai fini en tant qu’instructeur caporal suppléant, et mon frère aussi. Nous nous sommes retrouvés à Brandon au centre de formation du 101e et le premier groupe de stagiaires est arrivé en septembre 1941... 1940 – pardon, 1940. Ils y passaient un mois, puis nous avions une pause d’une semaine et un autre groupe arrivait. En janvier 1941, le colonel envoya deux d’entre nous, John Irwin de Pine Falls et moi-même, à Lethbridge à l’école de formation des armes légères afin de suivre un cours antigaz et de PT et et nous y sommes restés entre six et huit semaines. Lorsque nous sommes revenus, mon frère était parti pour Winnipeg et ses collègues, les autres sous-officiers, pour l’Université du Manitoba afin d’y suivre un cours de formation en artillerie. Ils formaient tant les stagiaires de 30 jours que les hommes de l’armée régulière. J’étais PM de service pour le personnel un samedi soir, je ne peux pas vous dire la date, mais au centre-ville le sergent Tracy est descendu et a dit, « Atkinson, votre frère veut que vous lui téléphoniez – voici le numéro. » Et j’ai téléphoné à Ronny et il a dit si tu veux venir avec nous à l’étranger, il faudrait que tu te dépêches pour être ici demain, parce que huit d’entre nous ici transférons aux Grenadiers pour aller en Jamaïque comme recrues de renforcement. Je suis entré un dimanche. Le colonel était tout à fait réceptif. Je lui ai dit que je m’étais engagé pour aller à l’étranger. Lui, il a dit « nous aimerions vous garder ici comme instructeur » et moi j’ai dit non, je m’en vais. Et j’étais à Winnipeg le dimanche mais ils n’ont pas envoyé mes documents, donc je ne suis pas entré à Sherbrooke, au Québec, avec les 70 hommes pour suivre la formation de six semaines; j’étais dans le dépôt de district jusqu’à leur retour. Nous avons fini par aller en Jamaïque en – je n’ai pas les dates – mais il c’était au milieu du mois de mai 1941 et, là-bas, nous étions à Newcastle, au camp de repos, pendant six semaines environ. Ils nous ont donné trois semaines avant de choisir une compagnie et j’ai choisi la compagnie « D ». Nous étions huit à rester là ensemble et nous avons choisi la compagnie « D », car elle était la prochaine qui devait prendre un mois de repos et nous sommes restés six à huit semaines à Newcastle. Nous avons toujours ri à ce sujet. Nous sommes retournés faire le service de garde au camp d’internement. C’était la garde régulière.

Quelle était votre impression du camp d’internement ?

Les Allemands et les Italiens ? Ils vivaient comme des rois. Ils vivaient comme des rois. Tout ce qu’ils voulaient, on leur donnait. Je ne me souviens pas de la taille des suivants, mais nous avions quatre poteaux d’angle avec des mitrailleuses Lewis – chargées de vraies balles – et environ tous les 50 pieds autour du périmètre il y avait un poste et environ toutes les 15 à 20 minutes l’équipe au sol à l’intérieur du périmètre changeait de poteau d’angle. Je me rappelle un gars du nom de Murray, Jimmy Murray – il a vécu à Saskatoon, en fait. Il était de garde dans la tour un jour et il a pris la Lewis et mitraillé le drapeau allemand à croix gammée qui avait été mis en place. Le drapeau n’a jamais plus été hissé et Murray a été enfermé dans la caserne ou mis en détention pour avoir tiré sur le drapeau. Les internés vivaient comme des rois, ils n’étaient pas des prisonniers de guerre. La grande majorité d’entre eux étaient des civils. Ils venaient de navires marchands et des zones de civils, puisque les Britanniques avaient envahi l’Afrique italienne – c’est ce qui se passait là.

Quelle était l’attitude de ces internés; vous paraissaient-ils le moindrement vaincus ou maussades ou étaient-ils...

Oh non, non, ils étaient plus arrogants que toute autre chose, plus arrogants que toute autre chose. Il y avait un homme noir là-dedans – Bustamante. Après la guerre, il a fini par être premier ministre de la Jamaïque et il est devenu Sir Bustamante. Donc, voilà. Il était un socialiste très radical et les autorités britanniques l’ont interné.

Comment décririez-vous le service des Grenadiers en Jamaïque, le type de service ?

Le service de garnison.

Y a-t-il eu de la formation d’infanterie en Jamaïque ?

Eh bien, pas dans mon cas. Il y avait une zone appelée Mt Pelliard et de temps en temps, une compagnie s’y rendait pour une formation de type infanterie, mais la formation qu’on nous donna était du même type que celle de la Première Guerre mondiale – la guerre dans les tranchées, et tout ça, où quelqu’un donnait un coup de sifflet et il fallait grimper. Notre formation à tous et chacun – même les Royal Rifles – était totalement différente de la façon dont nous avons dû nous battre à Hong Kong. Mais nous allons revenir à cette question.

Oui. Combien de temps avez-vous passé en Jamaïque – environ ?

Eh bien, c’était une croisière de plaisance. Il y avait 70 hommes et 11 officiers, je crois – des officiers de renforcement sur ce voyage. Nous sommes partis au mois de mai. Comme je l’ai dit, c’était une croisière de plaisance. Je suis revenu à Winnipeg au milieu de septembre. Comme la compagnie « D » avait été la première compagnie à partir pour la Jamaïque, elle était la première à revenir. Nous avions rejoint la bonne compagnie.

Donc, vous êtes de retour à Winnipeg et il est évident que le haut commandement a un autre objectif pour les Grenadiers.

Eh bien, on nous a dit que nous allions être rééquipés et que nous allions éventuellement rejoindre l’une des divisions qu’on organisait à ce moment-là; et comme on se rapprochait du temps qu’on devait partir, ils nous ont distribué de l’équipement KD – KD signifiait « Khaki Drill » – shorts, bandes molletières, nouveaux casques de soleil, et nous avons commencé à nous demander où dans le monde on nous envoyait.

Ils nous ont dit que nous allions à Vancouver pour continuer notre formation. Et c’est tout ce que nous savions. Curieusement, le jour de notre départ, mon père – mon beau-père – qui dirigeait le département des articles de porcelaine de Ashdown au niveau du détail, et faisait des affaires avec les restaurants chinois de Chinatown, m’a dit le jour que nous sommes partis qu’un vieil ami chinois de l’un des restaurants avait dit « ces garçons vont à Hong Kong. » Ils le savaient déjà. Donc, s’ils le savaient, les Japonais devaient le savoir aussi, avec les systèmes de renseignements qu’il y avait en place.

Avant de quitter le Canada, quelle a été votre impression de l’état de préparation des Grenadiers ?

Eh bien, du point de vue de la formation, quand je dis cela, je ne sépare pas un groupe de Grenadiers de l’autre, mais le régiment de Grenadiers d’origine qui est allé en Jamaïque en 1940 était un bataillon bien formé sur les mitrailleuses Vickers. Ils connaissaient ces mitrailleuses Vickers de A à Z. En fait, nous avons ici un homme, je ne sais pas si vous avez déjà interviewé Buster Agerback, mais Buster était membre d’une équipe de mitrailleuse Vickers et ces gars pouvaient démonter une mitrailleuse Vickers et la réassembler en un tournemain. Ils ont eu beaucoup de formation sur la mitrailleuse Vickers, mais ils étaient formés comme bataillon de mitrailleuses. Certains d’entre nous étaient qualifiés; dans mon cas, par exemple : j’étais un instructeur d’antigaz et de PT. J’avais été sur un parcours du combattant juste à l’extérieur de Shilo. On m’avait tiré des balles par-dessus la tête. Nous l’avons fait comme démonstration pour les stagiaires de 30 jours. Certains des renforts que nous avions recueillis avaient déjà été dans l’armée et avaient été instructeurs dans l’armée pendant deux ans quand ils nous ont rejoints en octobre 1941, tandis que nous traversions le Canada. Cependant, plusieurs d’entre eux – comme mon beau-frère – n’avaient été dans l’armée que depuis trois semaines et n’avaient jamais tenu un fusil entre les mains. Il y en avait plusieurs comme ça.

Cela semble très inégal.

Très inégal.

Que s’est-t-il passé lorsque vous êtes arrivés à Vancouver, M. Atkinson ?

Il y a un certain nombre d’histoires sur ce qui s’est passé. Puisque c’était de notre compagnie – la compagnie « D » – que certains d’entre nous avons débarqué du bateau, je vais vous raconter l’histoire. Un train est arrêté directement au sein des chantiers navals où étaient les bateaux. Sur le côté, il y avait 5 ou 6 voies ferrées du CP. Et nous avons débarqué et marché au pas à travers l’entrepôt – en passant, cet entrepôt est toujours là. Nous sommes montés à bord le SSH – HA-NSM Awatea; c’était un navire qui amenait du personnel des forces aériennes de l’Australie et de la Nouvelle-Zélande au Canada pour s’entraîner. Et nous avons été affectés à différents endroits. Au sein de la compagnie « D », nous étions chanceux que notre place était à côté du pont de dunette à l’arrière, juste au dessus de l’eau. Les hamacs – nous nous sommes installés, et le premier repas qu’on nous a servis était des tripes; et les plaintes ont commencé. Eh bien, quelqu’un a dit – et je me souviens de l’article dans la Free Press – qu’à Halifax en été 1941, l’armée de l’air était en route vers l’étranger et les hommes n’aimaient pas leurs conditions, et ils sont débarqués en masse du bateau et se sont tenus sur les quais, et les conditions ont été modifiées – ils ont même obtenu des draps blancs sur leurs lits – et nous, nous étions dans des hamacs, donc nous avons pensé débarquer et leur faire savoir. Et nous l’avons fait. Et le capitaine Neil Bardal [il a fini par devenir le capitaine Neil Bardal] – le lieutenant Bardal était notre officier de transport, et il est descendu et nous a dit que si nous ne retournions pas, nous serions accusés de désertion ou de mutinerie ou quoi que ce soit. Quatre-vingt-dix pour cent d’entre nous avons rembarqué, mais ceux qui avaient organisé notre descente sur le quai avaient disparu par l’entrepôt, et c’est sans doute la raison pour laquelle ils l’avaient fait, à mon avis. Et certains d’entre eux ont sauté du train en route vers l’Ouest aussi. Certains des gardes – les sous-officiers avaient mis des gardes à la porte – ont sauté du train.

COMBIEN D’HOMMES PENSEZ-VOUS AVOIR DÉSERTÉ ?

Vous m’avez eu là. Je dirais près de 20 de Winnipeg à Vancouver, en plus de l’épisode sur les quais. Mais il n’y avait pas de Rifles dans ce groupe.

DE VANCOUVER VOUS ÊTES SUR LA AWATEA...

Après cette petite – nous l’appellerons une émeute – cette perturbation, ils ont levé l’ancre, se sont détachés du quai et sont restés dans le port toute la nuit, et nous sommes partis le lendemain. Je suppose qu’ils pensé que si quelqu’un était assez fort pour nager jusqu’à la rive, c’était le sort qui en décidait ainsi.

À CETTE ÉPOQUE, QUELQU’UN AVAIT-T-IL UNE IDÉE CLAIRE D’OÙ VOUS ALLIEZ ?

Non, aucune idée du tout. Nous n’avions pas été informés de l’endroit où nous allions – je ne crois pas que c’était avant Hawaii, c’était après notre arrêt à Hawaï pour faire le plein qu’on nous a dit que nous allions à Hong Kong. Mais nous avions un sergent de la Compagnie « D » – Johnny Long – qui fut porté disparu au combat. Johnny Long nous a dit que nous allions à Singapour et il ne savait pas si c’était le cas ou non, mais tel était son avis. Et encore une fois, c’était à cause de notre drill d’été – nous portions des shorts et des bandes molletières.

QUAND ON VOUS A DIT QUE VOUS ALLIEZ À HONG KONG, MR. ATKINSON, QUELLE FUT LA RÉACTION GÉNÉRALE ?

Eh bien, on nous a dit que ça serait un travail de type garnison; tel est le message que nous avons reçu de notre officier de peloton, c’était ce qu’on leur avait dit. Ça serait très semblable à la fonction que nous avions remplie en Jamaïque, et c’est à peu près tout. Mais un officier nous a dit que nous pourrions avoir à nous battre en débarquant du bateau. Il a dit ça alors que nous nous approchions de Hong Kong.

À CETTE ÉPOQUE, SAVIEZ-VOUS QUI ÉTAIT SUSCEPTIBLE D’ÊTRE L’ENNEMI ?

Eh bien, nous avons toujours su que c’était le Japon. Une fois que nous avons découvert que nous allions à Hong Kong, nous savions qui serait l’ennemi.

POUVEZ-VOUS ME PARLER DU PASSAGE DE VANCOUVER À HONG KONG ?

Eh bien, ça c’est passé sans incidents. Nous avons reçu de la formation; quelques-uns des gars n’avaient jamais tiré un fusil-mitrailleur Bren, donc nous avons reçu une formation de tir au fusil-mitrailleur Bren. Aucun d’entre nous n’avait vu de mortier de deux pouces ou même de mortier de trois pouces. Nous avions entendu des histoires à leur sujet. On nous a fait passer des exercices factices avec des mortiers – il n’y avait pas d’obus de mortier sur lesquels s’exercer. Mais au cours d’un événement, le jeune – alors caporal Robinson, Roy Robinson de Winnipeg – avait été affecté à la veille des sous-marins et avait repéré un sous-marin pendant la nuit. Je suppose que c’était la fluorescence de l’eau, mais c’était un sous-marin américain, donc nous étions tout à fait sans danger; il a néanmoins été félicité pour ses yeux perçants, comme il était le caporal de cette veille de sous-marin. Mais non, nous sommes restés en forme, nous pouvions courir sur le pont, nous avions des matchs de boxe avec des gants, mais c’est à peu près tout. Ce fut un voyage sans incidents en ce sens. Lorsque nous sommes arrivés à Hawaii, les danseuses hawaïennes sont descendues à la station d’accueil et ont dansé pour nous. Juste à côté de nous était le... je crois que c’était le Lisbon Maru de San Francisco, chargé de Japonais des États-Unis qui retournaient au Japon. Le Lisbon Maru a été coulé, et presque tous les Royal Scots et la quasi-totalité des Middlesex ont été transférés à Hong Kong en tant que prisonniers du Japon. Le navire avait été coulé par un sous-marin américain. Mais notre voyage, le reste de ce voyage, s’est déroulé sans incident. Nous sommes partis des Philippines avec une escorte – le Prince Robert, un bateau de plaisance converti – et une compagnie « D »e Rifles était à bord. Quand nous avons quitté Manille, un croiseur britannique est descendu de Hong Kong nous escorter en double. Mais c’était un voyage sans incident. Nous avons quitté Manille et nous sommes arrivés à Hong Kong le lendemain matin.

QUELLE ÉTAIT VOTRE IMPRESSION DE HONG KONG QUAND LE NAVIRE EST ARRIVÉ ?

Eh bien, tout d’abord : les odeurs (rires). Vous n’avez jamais été à Hong Kong ? Même aujourd’hui, vous prenez l’avion là-bas et descendez de l’avion et vous sentez les mêmes odeurs de Hong Kong que nous avons senties à l’époque – le terme qui me vient à l’esprit est l’odeur d’égout – c’est étouffant. Ce n’est pas aussi mauvais qu’en 1941, mais en 1941 dans certaines régions, le sol était un égout à ciel ouvert; c’est de là qu’émanaient les odeurs.

QUE RETENEZ-VOUS DE L’ACCUEIL QUE VOUS AVEZ REÇU ?

Eh bien, je n’ai pas marché du quai jusqu’à Sham Shui Po. J’ai été affecté à charger les trousses de notre compagnie. Et j’ai eu un trajet en camion agréable jusqu’à Sham Shui Po, mais je n’ai rien vu – la seule chose que je peux me rappeler avoir vue sur des films ou des photos est la bienvenue que les peuples britannique et chinois ont donné aux Canadiens. Mais si vous parlez aux gars, ils vous diront qu’on pouvait entendre les remarques de certains dans la foule, comme quoi « ce ne sont pas tous des Indiens » – alors voilà, c’est la façon dont les gens voyaient les Canadiens à l’époque. Nous avions la chance d’avoir eu davantage de troupes, des choses comme ça. Mais je n’ai pas eu la chance de marcher à Sham Shui Po à partir des quais.

M. ATKINSON, VOUS VENEZ DE NOUS RACONTER LE DÉCHARGEMENT DE L’AWATEA ET LE FAIT QUE VOUS AVEZ PARTICIPÉ AU CHARGEMENT DE L’ÉQUIPEMENT À BORD DU CAMION. POUVEZ-VOUS NOUS DIRE CE QUI S’EST PASSÉ ENSUITE ?

Eh bien, nous avons pris Nathan Road de Kowloon à Sham Shui Po et je me souviens avoir vu tous ces gens chinois sur la rue. Une impression que j’ai eue – la première chose que j’ai vue était le nombre de chahoom – de mendiants – assis là à vouloir l’aumône – et ça m’a surpris, parce que même en Jamaïque, les personnes noires pauvres ne se faisaient pas payer grand chose par les Britanniques, mais vivaient de ce qu’elles gagnaient. À Hong Kong, cependant, il y avait un très grand nombre de mendiants et à chaque fois qu’on se retournait, il y en avait un derrière soi.

IL Y AVAIT DONC BEAUCOUP DE PAUVRETÉ EN GÉNÉRAL ?

Oui.

QUELLE A ÉTÉ VOTRE IMPRESSION DE LA CASERNE SHAM SHUI PO QUAND VOUS Y ÊTES ARRIVÉ ?

Typique des casernes de style britannique, comme en Jamaïque en ce sens. Nous sommes entrés dans nos huttes et nous avons eu les mêmes vieux lits de fer qu’on fermait le matin et qu’on déployait la nuit. Le matelas était composé de trois carrés de literie, bourré de fibres de noix de coco, soit cette coquille brune de noix de coco qu’on voit aujourd’hui – l’extérieur de la coque de couleur marron. En détention en Jamaïque, les gars des casernes martelaient ce matériel et ça s’étend comme – on ne dira pas comme de la noix de coco – mais ça s’étend comme de la paille lourde, et c’est ce qui remplissait les carrés de literie – c’était ça notre matelas.

À CE QUE J’AI COMPRIS, IL Y AVAIT QUELQUES EMPLOYÉS CHINOIS DANS LE CAMP.

En l’espace d’un jour, des Chinois sont arrivés; en fait, certains d’entre eux – à moins qu’on ne prenne garde, et une fois qu’on les connaissait mieux, ça allait – mais certains nous passaient la mousse à barbe le matin et nous rasaient avant même que nous fussions réveillés. Ça coûtait environ 25 cents Hong Kong par semaine – et ils faisaient même nos lits. Il y en avait peut-être deux ou trois dans chaque cabane.

COMBIEN DE TEMPS CELA A-T-IL DURÉ ?

Enfin, presque à partir du moment que nous sommes arrivés à la caserne jusqu’à ce que nous ayons quitté pour l’île. La dernière fois que nous sommes sortis, la veille, les Japonais attaquaient.

AVEZ-VOUS EU L’OCCASION DE PARLER AVEC DES RÉGULIERS BRITANNIQUES OU INDIENS ?

Eh bien, nous avons rencontré des Middlesex et quelques Royal Scots, et nous nous sommes liés d’amitié. Nous les avons rencontrés au restaurant Sung Sung. C’est une autre histoire. Mais leur impression était qu’ils avaient eu la mauvaise impression aussi, ils avaient été là depuis des années – on croyait que les Japonais n’attaqueraient jamais et qu’on pourrait les tenir à distance s’ils le faisaient. C’était leur avis. Mais la bagarre de Sung Sung – Sung Sung était un restaurant, et au deuxième étage il y avait un club de dîner dansant – pas vraiment de dîner, mais il y avait des danseuses et des boissons alcoolisées. C’était là qu’on pouvait rencontrer une femme genre Suzi Q. Le samedi, je suppose, le samedi avant la fin de semaine de l’attaque japonaise, il y avait un gars des Grenadiers, du nom de Ganier – il était français et il parlait un mélange de français et d’anglais, et l’un des Middlesex ou Royal Scots l’a traité de « territorial », et il s’y est objecté; il s’est levé et la bagarre a commencé. Ils trouvaient injuste la quantité d’argent que nous avions, ils ne pouvaient pas se procurer de pousse-pousse, car ils donneraient à un chauffeur de rickshaw 10 cents Hong Kong pour les transporter du camp à l’endroit où ils allaient et les Canadiens payaient 50 cents la promenade de pousse-pousse. Ils trouvaient injuste le montant de notre paie. Leur rémunération était une somme dérisoire. Je suppose que nous n’avons jamais eu à s’entendre sur le coût des réparations au Sung Sung, parce que la guerre a commencé dans la semaine.

ÊTES-VOUS ASSEZ DIPLOMATIQUE POUR DIRE QUE LA BAGARRE DE SUNG SUNG S’EST TERMINÉE À ÉGALITÉ ?

Eh bien, la police militaire britannique – nous avons gagné – parce que la police militaire britannique a été appelée et ils ne voulaient pas monter parce qu’il y avait des Canadiens durs à cuire là-haut. Cela a réglé l’affaire. En bas de l’escalier du restaurant, il y avait un réservoir de gros poissons – des poissons rouges et tout le reste – et il y avait un Wurltizer au sommet de l’escalier qui a fini dans le réservoir de poissons. Vous comprenez les problèmes que ça peut occasionner. Non, je dirais que les Rifles et les Grenadiers qui étaient là ont gagné la bagarre.

IL Y AVAIT UNE PLUS GRANDE BATAILLE À VENIR, ÉVIDEMMENT

Dont nous n’avions pas la moindre idée.

VOUS N’AVIEZ TOUJOURS AUCUNE INDICATION QUE LES JAPONAIS DEVAIENT ATTAQUER ?

Eh bien, non pas vraiment. Les sous-officiers, certains de nos sous-officiers avaient été emmenés à la frontière voir les défenses japonaises et les défenses britanniques. Notre compagnie s’adonnait à des exercices d’armement, qu’ils les appelaient, là où serait notre position. Et nous sommes allés exécuter le deuxième environ une journée avant que nous emménagions. Le matin que c’est arrivé, ce serait le 8 décembre là-bas et le 7 décembre ici, à cause de la ligne de changement de date. J’étais avec un autre gars – je crois que son prénom était Earl – Earl Till de Minitonas au Manitoba. Lui et moi étions de garde à notre casemate et le téléphone a sonné. J’étais au sommet du trou que nous avions creusé avec le fusil-mitrailleur Bren et lui était en bas, à la porte. Et le téléphone a sonné et il est rentré, et l’appel était pour le lieutenant Mitchell. Le message était que nous étions en guerre avec le Japon. Ça se serait passé vers 6 h 30 ou 7 h le matin et en quelques minutes, les bombardiers japonais sont arrivés. On savait ce qui se passerait – tout le monde dans tout le peloton et la casemate étaient sur la colline en train de regarder les bombardiers. Nous savions alors à coup sûr que nous étions en guerre, si vous voulez.

MR. ATKINSON, PARLONS UN MOMENT DE LA SITUATION RÉELLE DES GRENADIERS À CE MOMENT. VOUS AVEZ DÉJÀ MENTIONNÉ QUE LA FORMATION QU’ILS AVAIENT REÇUE JUSQU’À CE POINT ÉTAIT INÉGALE, ET D’AUTRES HOMMES N’AVAIENT AUCUNE FORMATION DU TOUT. CELA DIT, QUELLES ÉTAIENT LES ARMES DU RÉGIMENT ?

Eh bien, nous avions de vieilles mitrailleuses Vickers avec nous, que nous avions reçu des Britanniques dans la casemate. Puis, chaque peloton avait au moins un fusil-mitrailleur Bren et les sous-officiers dans la plupart des cas dans la compagnie « D », soit chacun de nos sous-officiers – le sergent, le caporal et le caporal suppléant – avaient des Tommy-guns, soit des mitraillettes Thompson, et le reste d’entre nous avions nos 303s et notre Enfield. Dans notre cas, notre peloton n’avait pas de mortiers – aucun mortier de 2 po.

Le régiment n’avait pas d’artillerie non plus ?

Nous n’avions pas d’artillerie ayant fait le voyage avec nous, non. Nous devions compter sur l’artillerie britannique en place.

Ainsi, le régiment n’avait ni d’artillerie, ni de mortiers lourds ?

Eh bien, nous avions des sections de mortiers qui avaient des mortiers de 3 po, mais aucun obus de mortier avant que la bataille n’ait déjà commencé. Après cela, on a reçu très peu de mortiers de 3 po.

PAS DE MITRAILLEUSES LOURDES ?

Nous n’avions pas emporté de mitrailleuses Vickers avec nous; nos mitrailleuses Vickers étaient des armes obtenues des Britanniques.

DONC, GÉNÉRALEMENT, ON DONNAIT AUX HOMMES DES GRENADES ET...

Nous avions des grenades, et quelques-unes de celles que nous avons enfin reçues n’étaient pas amorcées.

EN PLUS DE TOUT ÇA, LES HOMMES NE CONNAISSAIENT PAS LE TERRAIN.

C’est ça. Notre compagnie, la Compagnie « D », occupait le passage Wong Nei Chong. Il y a toute une histoire concernant le passage Wong Nei Chong. Notre peloton – le peloton d’Eric Mitchell – avait la casemate au sommet du passage et nous avions deux casemates autour de l’eau des bassins collecteurs sur les pentes inférieures du point d’observation Jardine’s Lookout. Bref, tant que nous étions là, avant que ne débarquent les Japonais, nous connaissions les zones autour de nos casemates, mais les Japonais débarquèrent dans la nuit du 18 et l’après-midi du 18, ils s’étaient déplacés. Notre peloton a reçu l’ordre de sortir des casemates et ils y ont placé des volontaires de Hong Kong. Nous avons gardé la casemate en haut du passage, soit celle qui était notre quartier général de peloton, mais les deux autres casemates ont été occupées par des bénévoles de Hong Kong.

REVENONS EN ARRIÈRE UN MOMENT SI POSSIBLE, M. ATKINSON. VOUS AVEZ INDIQUÉ PRÉCÉDEMMENT QUE CE QUI A EU LIEU EN PREMIER A ÉTÉ L’ATTAQUE JAPONAISE AÉRIENNE SUR L’ÎLE. TRÈS RAPIDEMENT, LES FORCES TERRESTRES JAPONAISES DANS LES NOUVEAUX TERRITOIRES ONT ENVAHI... J’AI CRU COMPRENDRE QU’AU DÉBUT, LES BRITANNIQUES DEVAIENT POUVOIR DÉFENDRE LE TERRAIN PENDANT DES SEMAINES.

Eh bien, Maltby croyait que la Gin Drinkers Line était assez forte pour résister à une percée. La Gin Drinkers Line serait, je ne pourrais pas vous dire exactement, mais je dirais à entre 5 et 7 milles de la frontière réelle, et les troupes britanniques étaient toutes à la Gin Drinkers Line mais les éclaireurs avaient fait le travail de démolition et reculé et l’une des compagnies du Pendjab leur servait de garde. Les Japonais ne passaient jamais sur les routes, ils se sont déplacés par d’autres voies terrestres – ils connaissaient le pays mieux que nous, et ils étaient bien formés pour ce type de guerre. Je crois que c’était le colonel Sojay, un colonel japonais de l’une des compagnies, j’oublie les régiments, j’oublie le nombre, le 130e régiment, je pense, qui a repéré à partir de la montagne Ti Marchan, si ma mémoire est bonne, repéré la Gin Drinkers Line et jugé qu’il pourrait la percer. Ce n’était pas son secteur, mais il a envoyé une compagnie « D »ans la nuit et ils ont subjugué les Royal Scots à la Gin Drinkers Line – c’est là que la percée a commmencé. Là, Maltby a fustigé les Royal Scots pour ne pas avoir tenu leur position, mais mettons que la compagnie « D »e Royal Scots responsable de cette section de la Gin Drinkers Line n’avait pas tous les effectifs nécessaires. Ils avaient été là-haut en train de travailler et c’était la saison du paludisme; certains d’entre eux étaient malades – ils avaient le paludisme. La compagnie était à peu près à la moitié des effectifs nécessaires et les Japonais n’ont pas eu de problèmes à percer dans ce secteur. Ils avaient capturé la zone en quelques heures et Maltby n’a permis à aucun Rajput de les en chasser. Quand c’est arrivé, en passant, la compagnie « D » des Grenadiers était allée au passage Wong Nei Chong, où se trouvait une compagnie qu’on appelait mobile, et ils nous ont emmenés à la partie continentale. On nous a dit le lendemain matin que nous allions mener un combat d’arrière-garde pour les Royal Scots et nous nous sommes déplacés le long de la route Ti Po presque au-dessus de notre vieux camp Sham Shui Po – on pouvait voir le camp. Nous étions en face de Stone Cutters Island sur une courbe de la route. Le peloton de Mitchell, notre peloton, avait le poste de défense sur le bassin collecteur des eaux et nous avions une section sur la colline à notre droite, comme défense de ce côté, et une autre section plus bas. Les deux autres compagnies – les deux autres pelotons – étaient répartis en dessous de nous et à l’extérieur. Nous n’avons pas vu de Japonais de la journée. Vers 6 h, peut-être 5 h 30 ils sont venus et nous ont dit que nous allions passer à l’arrière au chantier naval. Nous traversions une section en catimini, ensuite une autre section s’arrêtait et la garde arrière traversait. Quand nous sommes arrivés à l’endroit où se trouvaient nos camions chinois, nous ne pouvions pas les déplacer; les pilotes chinois avait disparu et les camions ne fonctionnaient pas. Quoi qu’il en soit, nous avons éventuellement fini sur les quais – les chantiers de construction navale – et ils ont fait venir un traversier. Nous sommes montés à bord de ce dernier et nous nous sommes dirigés vers l’île. Mais nous avions été là, je suppose... nous sommes allés au terrain de polo dans la nuit et nous y sommes restés toute la nuit et tout le lendemain; et puis, si j’avais mon livre ici, j’ai quelques détails, je dirais que c’était le matin du 11 – le 10, nous nous sommes déplacés le 10, nous nous sommes mis en poste sur la route de Ti Po et nous avons évacué cette nuit-là. Nous nous sommes retrouvés au passage Wong Nei Chong quelques jours plus tard.

Sans coup de feu de la part des Grenadiers ?

Pas de la part de notre peloton, mais le peloton de Bob Manchester a eu une escarmouche, et je pense que l’autre peloton en a eu une aussi. Deux hommes sont disparus par la suite – le capitaine Bowman les a envoyés en mission de reconnaissance vers le réservoir Shing Mun [redoute], que les Japonais avaient conquis, et lorsque nous avons quitté notre position, ils n’étaient toujours pas revenus. Swanson et un jeune gars du Manitoba rural, nous ne les avons jamais revus. Swanson a fini sur l’île, il s’est mêlé au Royal Scots, mais, mautadit, je ne me souviens pas du nom de l’autre gars, mais de toute façon, nous ne l’avons jamais revu. C’est là que je suis en désaccord avec la série « Savage Christmas »– je ne suis pas en désaccord qu’il fut le premier Canadien tué à Hong Kong, ou qu’il a été porté disparu au combat, mais dans une section de ce livre « Savage Christmas », les auteurs décrivent comment il est mort sous les balles japonaises. C’est totalement faux, parce qu’il était du peloton de Manchester et Swanson a fini à Wong Nei Chong avec nous deux jours plus tard, et nous n’avons jamais vu... mautadit – Je me sens mal à ce sujet, je connais son nom pourtant – mais il était d’une région rurale du Manitoba, située au nord de Brandon, dans la région de Grossburn.

L’ESSENTIEL ICI CEPENDANT EST QUE LES GRENADIERS ONT LA PARTICULARITÉ D’AVOIR ÉTÉ LA PREMIÈRE UNITÉ ARMÉE CANADIENNE AU COMBAT.

Pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, oui : la compagnie « D » des Winnipeg Grenadiers.

VOUS AVEZ INDIQUÉ QUE LA COMPAGNIE « D » AVAIT RECULÉ ET FAIT DOUBLE TOUR.

Nous nous sommes retrouvés au passage Wong Nei Chong quelques jours plus tard.

COMBIEN DE TEMPS S’EST-IL PASSÉ AVANT QUE LES JAPONAIS N’ENVAHISSENT LA ZONE DE KOWLOON ?

Eh bien, la nuit du 11 ou le matin du 12, il n’y avait pas plus de troupes alliées sur le continent. Peut-être dans des zones dispersées – pas les positions de défense importantes; on a évacué tous ceux qui pouvaient sortir.

Quel a été l’effet sur le moral des hommes sur l’île de la conquête si rapide par les Japonais d’une position défensive supposément imprenable ?

Eh bien, je dirais que la plupart d’entre nous ne croyions pas à quoi que ce soit qui sortait du bureau de Maltby ou de son quartier général. Nous savions que si jamais les Japonais atterrissaient sur l’île que nous allions faire face à un combat difficile et que ça n’allait pas durer trop longtemps – on pouvait voir cela. Mais Maltby – la propagande du général Maltby a été bonne, mais n’a jamais stimulé aucune morale – en ce qui me concerne; si le reste d’entre eux étaient comme moi, on pouvait voir ce qui allait se passer.

EST-CE VOTRE IMPRESSION QUE LA PLUPART DES HOMMES SAVAIENT QUE LE COMBAT ALLAIT ÊTRE SANS ESPOIR ?

Je suis tout à fait sûr de cela, tout à fait sûr.

Qu’est-il arrivé par la suite ?

Eh bien, comme je le disais, nous sommes retournés dans nos casemates – notre peloton – c’est la raison pour laquelle je ne peux parler que pour notre peloton et notre compagnie. Pendant la journée du 18, ils ont déplacés deux de nos sections des casemates 2 et 3 sur les pentes inférieures de Jardine’s Lookout. Nous avons tous fini par revenir à la casemate 1 à droite, au sommet du passage, et il était environ 19 h, je suppose – il se faisait sombre et l’un de nos coureurs de la compagnie est venu et on nous a dit que nous devions aller garder le réservoir Wong Nei Chong. Vers 22 h, un coureur est venu et a sommé Mitchell de descendre au quartier général de la compagnie. Il est descendu pour voir Bowman. Puis, il est revenu pour dire que nous devions laisser une section ici et que les deux autres sections devaient se rendre au passage Stanley. Nous devions y rencontrer la compagnie « A » des Winnipeg Grenadiers. Nous sommes allés au mont Butler avec un guide chinois. Nous nous sommes égarés sur les pentes à l’aube le lendemain matin – nous étions sur les pentes inférieures de Jardine’s Lookout, et pas de guide chinois : il avait disparu. Nous n’avons jamais vu cette compagnie. Comme il se faisait jour, Eric Mitchell sortit sa carte. Il pouvait apercevoir le mont Butler et il savait où nous étions – nous pouvions voir notre ancienne casemate et juste à ce moment, Tippy McKorrister de Portage La Prairie a chuchoté que les arbustes là-bas se déplaçaient. Dans ce coin de pays, les Chinois déterraient même les racines pour en faire du bois de chauffage. Et quand on le voit aujourd’hui, il y a là une incroyable quantité de végétation et de croissance des arbres, mais à cette époque il y en avait très peu sur ces collines. Et il a fait remarquer la chose à Mitchell – Mitchell a donné l’ordre de tirer, tout le monde a obéi, je ne sais pas si nous les avons atteints ou non, mais ce que je vais dire ici, c’est que quand j’ai eu à tirer en sachant que je tirais sur un être humain, je me suis mouillé la culotte. C’était facile de tirer sur des lapins quand j’étais gamin – je visais juste, mais je n’avais jamais visé d’être humain et n’avais jamais pensé que j’allais le faire. C’était pourquoi je m’étais mouillé la culotte; question de trac, ou de fièvre de la rampe. Nous étions couchés sur la pente inférieure dégarnie du bassin collecteur d’eau et Mitchell a montré une crête du doigt et a dit que nous devions la grimper, et que nous étions couverts, mais nous ne savions pas ce qu’il y avait de l’autre côté. Eh bien, il a consulté sa carte de nouveau et il a repéré le mont Butler et il a dit qu’on devrait descendre cette vallée, car on y trouverait la compagnie « A » à quelque part. Nous les avons rencontrés vers 10 h, et une partie de la Compagnie « A » avait déjà été sur le mont Butler et en avait été chassée; c’est là que se trouvait Osborn, et nous les avons rencontrés sur une crête surplombant le réservoir de Tai Tam. Quand on regardait par-dessus le bord et de l’autre côté de la terre rouge sablonneuse de l’autre rive  – il y avait là des milliers de Japonais. Et nous ignorions qu’il y avait aussi des centaines de Japonais au-dessous de nous. Nous étions sur une crête. On nous a lancé des grenades – nous en avons lancé en réponse, et certaines de nos grenades nous sont revenues, car elles n’avaient pas d’amorces; c’est comme ça que nous avons découvert que certaines d’entre elles n’avaient pas été amorcées. Vers 16 h, le major Gresham... la situation était désespérée, et le major Gresham a sommé les officiers et ils ont décidé de se retirer vers le fond de la vallée pour retrouver la compagnie « D » à Wong Nei Chong. Nous ne savions pas ce qui était derrière nous. Nous nous sommes mis en route et avons fait venir les fusils-mitrailleurs Bren qui étaient sur les bords des sections, et nous avons perdu Charlie Smith qui était affecté à un fusil-mitrailleur Bren ainsi que son second, l’homme qui insérait les chargeurs pour lui; et un jeune avec qui je suis allé à l’école dans le coin nord de Winnipeg – Carvery, Sam Carvery – était à l’autre fusil-mitrailleur; mais le jeune Oscar Goodman de Selkirk, avec qui je suis allé à l’école – Oscar était le numéro 2 de son homme – lui, il est revenu avec le Bren. Nous avons fini par quitter cette région et retourner vers Stanley et le passage Wong Nei Chong, et deux des hommes portaient le capitaine Carver – Lyle Carver, qui avait été blessé – c’était une blessure au ventre et il perdait beaucoup de sang, et il leur dit alors « déposez-moi sur ces rochers, je ne vais pas pouvoir continuer. J’ai mon revolver si j’en ai besoin » – et ils l’ont laissé. Jim McIver et moi ne savions pas qui était l’autre gars. Nous nous sommes retrouvés dans un ravin et quelques-uns des gars ont commencé à monter et les Japonais étaient déjà là, en-dessous de nous, au passage Stanley, qui est juste au-dessus du passage Wong Nei Chong. Ce n’était nulle part près de Stanley, où étaient les fusils, mais c’est un endroit appelé le passage Stanley et il y avait là une position britannique antiaérienne, et c’était après que nous avions quitté l’endroit et descendu la vallée pour rencontrer la compagnie « A » que les Japonais y étaient arrivés. Ce fut notre bataille finale. C’était la nuit du 19. C’est là que Osborn, John Osborn, a perdu la vie. Ils étaient en mesure de se déplacer en-dessous de nous. Nous pouvions voir les Japonais, mais nous ne pouvions pas voir directement vers le bas en raison de la crête, et c’est à ce moment qu’ils nous ont jeté leurs grenades et lui, il les prenait et les leur relançait; mais la dernière fois, il fut trop tard et il s’est jeté dessus, d’après ce que le sergent Pugsley a déclaré; John Osborn avec son casque – il a couvert la grenade de son casque et s’est couché dessus. Et ce fut tout.

POUR CELA, LE SERGENT-MAJOR OSBORN A REÇU LA CROIX VICTORIA À TITRE POSTHUME.

Si Pugsley, le caporal Hall, Jack Pollock, et un autre gars, n’étaient pas rentrés, je ne pense pas que cette histoire de John Osborn aurait été racontée, parce que je ne l’ai pas vue arriver. Earl Till et moi – Earl était mon numéro 2 – J’ai emporté un fusil-mitrailleur Bren. Earl Till et moi étions sur un côté d’une crête en forme de demi-lune et Osborn était à l’autre extrémité de la crête. Nous avons entendu les grenades – et j’ai oublié une chose : quand quelqu’un a crié "grenades", tout le monde s’est penché et je me suis rabattu le casque sur la tête et mon numéro 2 sur le fusil-mitrailleur Bren s’est couché sur le dos et a chargé le fusil-mitrailleur; et j’ai entendu gémir Till. J’ai dit : « Till, qu’est-ce qui ne va pas » et il a dit « je pense que j’ai été atteint », et une grenade l’avait frappé à l’estomac. Eh bien, nous lui avons mis un pansement de combat en faisant de notre mieux. À ce moment, nous n’avions plus de munitions pour le fusil-mitrailleur Bren – elles s’étaient épuisées, et il nous restait très peu de munitions pour nos fusils. Je suppose que le major Gresham, vu le nombre de blessés que nous avions, jugea que la discrétion était la première des vertus. Certains d’entre eux voulaient qu’il attende jusqu’à la nuit – jusqu’à ce qu’il fasse complètement noir– avant de sortir, et il a dit non, parce qu’il faudrait alors quitter les blessés, puisqu’ils ne pouvaient pas marcher. Et le major Gresham marcha jusqu’à la crête en agitant son mouchoir blanc, et ils lui ont tiré dessus et l’ont tué. Peu après, ils sont venus nous désarmer et nous faire prisonniers. C’est la dernière fois que j’ai vu Oscar Goodwin; et nous avions un Métis de Saint-Laurent au Manitoba – Leo De’Laurier, il faisait environ 6 pi 5, grand et maigre. Je disais toujours qu’il était un maigre indien, mais maudit bon soldat. Oscar Goodwin était un peu plus court que moi. Alors qu’ils nous faisaient marcher au pas les mains en l’air, ils ont tiré De’Laurier et Goodwin du groupe et nous ne les avons jamais revus, mais nous les avons entendus toute la nuit. Ils ont dû les utiliser pour exercer leurs épées – quels que soient les hommes que ramenaient les Japonais, on les voyait faire. Nous n’avons jamais revu ni Goodwin, ni De’Laurier.

COMBIEN DE TEMPS LEUR A-T-IL FALLU AVANT DE MOURIR ?

Eh bien, nous ne les avons plus entendus après l’aube du lendemain matin. Je dirais que cela leur a pris presque toute la nuit avant de mourir. Ils nous ont désarmés; dans certains cas ils ont pris nos montres, nos portefeuilles, nos photos, ils ne voulaient pas nous laisser quoi que ce soit et ils nous ont faits descendre la colline au pas. Nous avions les mains en l’air et si quelqu’un les laissait tomber, on le frappait dans le dos à la baïonnette. J’ai eu de la chance que ça ne me soit pas arrivé. Ils nous ont fait descendre une pente au pas, le long d’une route jusqu’à une position au passage Stanley, où les Britanniques avaient leurs positions antiaériennes, et ils nous ont mis dans un immeuble comme un grand garage, de peut-être 30 pieds de long et 20 pieds de large, et nous n’étions peut-être pas plus que 50 hommes. On nous a entassés là-dedans. Stan Beatty et moi nous sommes dirigés au coin et il y avait un banc le long du mur et nous nous sommes tenus debout sur le banc qu’il y avait là – ils continuaient à entasser les gens dans l’édifice et Stan m’a dit qu’il se demandait où était son frère Ike; et j’ai dit oui, je me demandais à mon tour où était Ronnie. Tout d’un coup, en-dessous de moi, j’ai entendu, « Harold, c’est toi ? » C’était mon frère juste là en-dessous de moi. Il avait été blessé au bras, et s’était retrouvé dans une de ces casemates sous Jardine’s Lookout. Lui et Derrick Ricks ont tous deux reçu une décoration pour une partie de leur action. Je peux vous en parler plus tard. Quoi qu’il en soit, le lendemain matin juste au lever du jour – nous savions que le jour se levait parce que le toit et le mur étaient ébréchés et la lumière du jour perçait – nous avons entendu un obus de mortier, une bombe fusée, nous passer par-dessus la tête et tomber. Un autre nous a manqué, puis le prochain est tombé à travers le coin du toit et le jeune Eric Mitchell était juste en dessous. Il a été blessé par des éclats d’obus. Je ne dirai pas qu’il était méconnaissable, mais il était assez grièvement blessé. Son frère Vaughn... la dernière fois que j’avais vu le lieutenant Vaughn Mitchell était au sein de la compagnie « A », et quand ils nous ont fait sortir de là, il y avait un certain nombre d’hommes tués et blessés dans ce bâtiment; Tommy Matte était l’un d’eux et je pense que Tiger, frère de Buster Agerback, était là déjà blessé. Il y était entré blessé et y a été tué. Le lendemain matin, quand ils nous ont sortis, ils ne nous ont laissé prendre aucun des blessés à moins que ces derniers ne puissent marcher. Nous n’avons jamais revu Eric Mitchell ou Vaughn Mitchell. Vaughn ne voulait pas quitter son frère, mais le lieutenant McKillop de Portage La Prairie marchait, il avait une blessure par balle et il partit avec nous. Ils nous ont ligotés par groupes de quatre avec notre propre fil téléphonique de communication : nous avions les mains liées derrière le dos et une boucle autour du cou. Ils attachaient quatre ou cinq d’entre nous ensemble et si les mains d’un homme tombaient ou n’importe qui d’autre ralentissait, la corde se resserrait autour du cou, pas comme un garrot, mais assez pour déranger. Ils nous ont fait marcher à partir de là, le long de route Stanley, vers le réservoir Tai Tam, au passage Tai Tam en fait et au-dessus de la colline, et nous nous sommes retrouvés à North Point. En chemin, un jeune de Carmen, au Manitoba – Je ne peux pas me rappeler son prénom – Kilfoyle était son nom; il avait été blessé et ne pouvait pas suivre les autres. Le garde japonais l’a séparé du groupe et nous avons continué. Nous avons entendu crier Kilfoyle et nous pouvions imaginer ce qui lui était arrivé : ils l’avaient passé à la baïonnette et poussé par-dessus le précipice. Nous nous sommes retrouvés à North Point ce soir-là et la seule eau que nous avions à boire à ce moment-là depuis la veille – nous n’avions pas nos bouteilles d’eau avec nous – était de l’eau de pluie, qui coulait des bassins collecteurs. Nous avons capté la pluie coulant du toit des huttes à North Point – certains hommes avaient leurs casques d’acier. On nous a fait marcher ensuite au traversier et on nous a emmenés au couvent sur le côté de Kowloon. J’ai oublié la rue où il se trouvait. J’ai été là-bas depuis. Il était très proche du camp Argyle. C’est là, dans la mission Maryknoll, que nous avons eu à manger et à boire pour la première fois depuis notre reddition. Le prêtre catholique a obtenu des Japonais qu’ils nous donnent quelques biscuits durs et un peu d’eau et nous laissent soigner nos blessés. Le lendemain, ils nous ont emmenés à Argyle et nous n’avions rien pour faire la cuisine; finalement ils nous ont apporté un peu de riz, et les gars qui pouvaient cuisiner ont mis en place une sorte de cuisine.

QUELLE ÉTAIT LA GRANDEUR DU CAMP ARGYLE ?

C’était un ancien camp de réfugiés chinois. Je dirais donc qu’il y avait là environ huit huttes – encore là des cabanes de style britannique. Elles faisaient environ 60 pieds de long et 20 pieds de large et avaient un plancher de ciment. Le lendemain matin, vers 5 h, la première chose que nous avons entendue était l’artillerie qui nous cassait les oreilles. Les Japonais s’étaient rendus aux plaines, y avaient emporté leur grosse artillerie et tiraient sur l’île. À ce moment, nous étions à peu près le 21 ou le 22; la seule chose qu’on nous donnait à manger était du riz une fois par jour. Et le 26 décembre, ils ont choisi environ 30 d’entre nous et par le biais d’un interprète, ils nous ont dit que nous allions à notre ancien camp d’armée à Sham Shui Po pour le nettoyer. L’île s’était rendue et c’est là que les prisonniers devaient se diriger. Dans ce camp Argyle, nous avions un médecin, il n’avait rien sous la main pour nous soigner – pas de pansement ou quoi que ce soit. Tout ce qu’il avait étaient les trousses de combat des hommes, que certains d’entre eux avaient réussi à garder. Le lieutenant McKillop est mort vers la fin de décembre et Earl Till, vers le 15 janvier – c’était dû à la perte de sang; le médecin ne pouvait rien faire pour lui. En attendant, nous sommes passés au camp Sham Shui Po, et je ne pouvais pas croire ce qui s’était passé dans ce camp lorsque nous l’avons vu. Sans parler de la plomberie, même les cadres de fenêtres avaient disparu; on avait tout pris. Il n’y avait que le sol en ciment, les murs en brique de roche et le toit. Les Chinois avaient tout vidé. Nous avons nettoyé ce que nous pouvions. Je ne me souviens plus de la date. La plupart des Grenadiers, des Royal Scots et des troupes britanniques se sont retrouvés à Sham Shui Po au début de janvier. Les Grenadiers sont restés à Sham Shui Po jusqu’au 26 janvier – je sais cette date, et on nous a transférés à North Point et on a transféré les Middlesex et ceux qui n’étaient pas des Britanniques à Sham Shui Po. Ils ont laissé la marine britannique à North Point avec nous. Les Canadiens étaient de nouveau réunis. C’est à ce moment que les difficultés ont commencé. Le brigadier Holm... nous savions que Lawson était mort, nous l’avons appris, et le colonel Holm des Rifles était le colonel supérieur et je pense que les officiers ont décidé qu’il serait le nouveau brigadier – il a donné de nouveaux ordres. On a rétabli l’ordre. Il faut dire que nous étions une bande de racaille dans ce sens – pas rasés, négligés – nous n’avions pas de quoi nous raser – et les brigadiers et les Rifles nous ont donné l’ordre de redevenir soldats. Nous devions retrouver la discipline, nous raser le mieux possible et nous garder propres. Cela a ramené un peu d’ordre dans le camp. Or, tandis que quelques-uns des hommes s’y opposaient, mon opinion personnelle est que c’était quelque chose qui devait être fait, sinon aucun d’entre nous ne serait jamais revenu au pays, parce que nous étions une racaille. Cela nous a rappelés à l’ordre. Mais il y a une autre histoire; je ne peux pas pardonner à certains de nos officiers. Je peux parler au nom des officiers des Grenadiers. Cela concerne ce qui s’est passé à North Point. Je n’ai pas honte de raconter cette histoire à leur sujet, même si certains d’entre eux sont encore en vie. Ce n’était pas nos officiers subalternes. Lorsque le colonel Sutcliffe est mort en avril 1942 à North Point, le major Trist, George Trist, a pris le commandement des Grenadiers. À ce moment, les Japonais payaient tous les officiers canadiens l’équivalent du rang japonais. Si nous travaillions, nous étions payés 10 cents par jour et nous n’en voulions pas aux officiers pour se faire payer, ce n’est pas la raison de mon indignation. Un cantinier était venu s’installer et ils pouvaient acheter ce qu’ils voulaient dans cette cantine parce qu’ils étaient payés. C’étaient les autres rations – le colonel Trist avait décidé de mettre en place un carré des officiers et mettons que si du bœuf arrivait dans le camp, on donnait aux Grenadiers l’eau dans laquelle il avait été cuit et certains de nos officiers, eux, recevaient du bœuf tranché. Un certain nombre de nos gars l’avoueront, mais ils ne sont pas tous comme moi, ils n’en parleront pas. Le sergent Donnelly, notre sergent cuisinier, a été mis à la porte de la cuisine parce qu’il n’était pas d’accord avec ce que voulait Trist, et Trist a installé son propre sergent cuisinier. Il a changé le personnel de cuisine.

QUEL EFFET CELA A-T-IL EU SUR LE MORAL DES HOMMES ?

Eh bien, nous sommes restés disciplinés, mais nous étions un groupe discipliné dur à cuire – c’est l’effet qu’a eu la situation. Nous nous y opposions. En effet, dans le journal de Tommy Forsyth, Tommy parle d’un sujet connexe, je ne peux pas dire si s’était le 1er juillet 1942 ou le 1er août 1942, mais un commentaire de Tom ce jour-là était que quand ils sont rentrés du travail, les Royal Rifles ont eu de la tarte aux dattes ce soir-là, je me demande où sont passées nos dattes – nous avons eu de l’eau de dattes à mettre sur notre riz. Nous savons ce qui s’est passé à nos dattes, les officiers les ont prises. Et encore une fois, je dis que je n’ai pas peur d’en parler – je n’ai jamais eu peur. Mais la plupart de ces officiers supérieurs sont décédés – avec tout le respect que je dois aux gars et à leurs descendants, je pense que c’est quelque chose dont on aurait dû parler il y a plusieurs années, mais cela n’a jamais été publié dans un livre. Même Tom, quand il a publié son journal sous forme de livre, n’a jamais beaucoup ajouté à ce sujet – mais je n’ai pas peur de parler.

EST-CE QUE CELA A CONTINUÉ – EST-CE QUE LES OFFICIERS...

Cela a continué tout le temps que nous étions à North Point. Lorsque nous sommes allés à Sham Shui Po – en septembre, vers le 26 septembre nous sommes retournés à Sham Shui Po – ils ont transféré les Royal Scots et les Middlesex au Japon; ils étaient sur le Lisbonne Maru dont j’ai parlé plus tôt, qui avait coulé. Ils nous ont ramenés à Sham Shui Po et nous avons dû réinstaller nos cuisines à partir de zéro. Après cela, le cantinier qui venait n’avait pas grand chose qu’ils voulaient acheter, mais je dois revenir à North Point; le colonel Crawford et nos médecins n’avaient rien – Gray et Banfield ont insisté auprès des officiers des deux régiments pour que ceux-ci fournissent un fonds de repas. C’était en juillet 1942 : un grand nombre d’entre nous souffrions gravement de dysenterie. Nous avions perdu beaucoup de poids – je pesais environ 110 lb. Fournir un peu plus de nourriture signifiait dresser une tente et à l’heure du midi, ceux d’entre nous qui obtenions ce supplément recevaient du riz cuit comme de la bouillie d’avoine, parfois agrémenté de bœuf salé; cela a contribué à me sauver la vie, j’en suis sûr, et je remercie Crawford et les médecins pour ça. Peu de gens s’en souviennent, mais moi, oui. Et Cliff Mathews à Winnipeg s’en souvient, parce que Cliff était un autre gars dans la tente, mais n’importe quel homme qui était dans cette tente peut s’en souvenir. Il y avait des Rifles là aussi mais je ne me souviens pas des individus qui y étaient. Là, à Sham Shui Po, dans la cantine, les prix étaient tels que les officiers n’obtenaient pas la même quantité mais ils avaient toujours quelque chose – la plupart du temps, ils pouvaient se procurer des cigarettes. Les cigarettes ne coûtaient pas trop cher à ce moment-là. Le carré n’avait pas changé tant que ça, mais celui des officiers avait été légèrement modifié, tout en continuant.

MAINTENANT POUR EN REVENIR À NORTH POINT, M. ATKINSON, QUELLES EN ÉTAIENT LES CONDITIONS SANITAIRES ?

Eh bien, quand nous sommes arrivés là, ils étaient tous en train de travailler. Nous y sommes arrivés le 26 janvier. J’imagine que les Rifles qui le pouvaient avaient tout réparé. Au moment où nous sommes arrivés, les toilettes fonctionnaient et tout le reste. Je dirais que les Japonais avaient fait réparer par les Chinois les conduites d’eau qui entraient dans le camp. Nous avons des toilettes à chasse d’eau et des douches – à l’eau froide, pas à l’eau chaude. La section que nous avions chez les Grenadiers était ainsi et je pense que les Rifles avaient les mêmes installations.

QUELS SONT VOS SOUVENIRS DES RATIONS QUE VOUS RECEVIEZ À NORTH POINT ?

Les quoi ?

LES RATIONS, DES RATIONS ALIMENTAIRES.

Eh bien, elles variaient, la plupart étaient composées de... lorsque je parle de riz, cela pouvait être un mélange de riz et d’orge ou quoi que ce soit, mais les rations étaient maigres. On nous donnait un bol de ce riz cuit deux fois par jour et une soupe verte claire, et comme je l’ai dit plus tôt, parfois nous avions une saveur de viande et c’était ce qu’on avait utilisé pour faire cuire le rôti de bœuf des officiers.

DONC, EN GÉNÉRAL, CE RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE ÉTAIT SURTOUT DU RIZ ?

Surtout un régime de grains, oui.

DONC, VOUS EN RECEVIEZ ENVIRON DEUX TASSES PAR JOUR ?

Oui.

LÀ, LES HOMMES QUI MANGEAIENT CE RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE ONT PERDU DU POIDS, VOUS L’AVEZ DÉJÀ MENTIONNÉ.

Oh oui, quand j’ai été fait prisonnier, je pesais environ 170 livres et, après la dysenterie, quand j’étais dans cette tente alimentaire, je pesais 110 lb.

AVEC LA PERTE DE POIDS ET LA DYSENTERIE, Y A-T-IL EU D’AUTRES PROBLÈMES DE SANTÉ PARMI LES HOMMES ?

Eh bien, nous avons développé ce que nous appelions les pieds Hong Kong, ou pieds électriques. Cela venait du béribéri – les cordons à l’arrière de la cheville se resserrent et le jeune Dubé – Dubé a vécu sur la côte pendant longtemps – quand il marchait, il ne pouvait plus se plier les chevilles, il a perdu toute cette capacité – il marchait les pieds plats comme un handicapé. Ses pieds ne se sont jamais améliorés. Plusieurs d’entre nous, je suppose, avions encore les pieds électriques, mais tandis que cet état s’améliorait, le béribéri œdémateux persistait.

QUELS SONT VOS SOUVENIRS AU SUJET DES GARDES QUI ÉTAIENT LÀ À NORTH POINT ?

Pas grand chose. Une clôture électrique avait été posée autour du camp. Je me souviens d’un cas lorsqu’ils ont poursuivi un jeune couple chinois dans la rue là où étaient les rails du chemin de fer; ils les ont fait rentrer, les ont ligotés à un poteau et ont finalement tué les deux. Le poste de garde japonais était dans la section des Rifles et je me souviens que quelques-uns des Rifles que je connaissais ont décrit comment ils pouvaient entendre la jeune fille chinoise toute la nuit, je suppose que les Japonais la violaient – mais les jeunes étaient morts tous les deux le lendemain matin. Ils les ont passés à la baïonnette. Et quoi que ce soit qu’ils voulaient du Chinois, ils l’ont utilisé pour se pratiquer à la baïonnette, mais avant ça, ils l’ont utilisé pour pratiquer le jiu-jitsu – en le jetant partout et en les attachant à ce poste.

CELA S’EST FAIT À LA VUE DES PRISONNIERS ?

Oh oui, bien sûr, bien sûr. Non à la vue des Grenadiers, parce que nous étions en bas à la place d’armes – ce qu’on appelait la place d’armes à une extrémité du camp, en fait; non, je n’ai pas la photo ici avec moi. Les Rifles étaient là où se trouvait l’entrée – la porte des gardes et le poste de garde.

AVEC LE TRANSFERT DES PRISONNIERS DE GUERRE BRITANNIQUES VERS LE JAPON, SHAM SHUI PO ÉTAIT DÉSORMAIS OUVERT POUR QU’ON Y EMMÉNAGE LES CANADIENS.

Eh bien, ils nous ont tous transférés à Sham Shui Po pour nous garder tous ensemble. Il ne restait plus personne à North Point. Quand nous sommes arrivés là-bas, la plupart des officiers britanniques avaient été transférés à Argyle – ils les avaient séparés, pour contrôler les hommes à l’écart des officiers supérieurs; c’était une des raisons. Éventuellement, ils ont transférés certains de nos officiers supérieurs canadiens à Argyle également. Mais après notre départ pour le Japon, ils sont revenus à Sham Shui Po, sauf qu’après le départ des Royal Scots et des Middlesex, les dimensions du camp avaient été réduites.

UNE CHOSE QUI ME VIENT À L’ESPRIT, M. ATKINSON, CONCERNE LES OFFICIERS. LES HOMMES AVAIENT-ILS LE MOINDRE CONTACT DIRECT AVEC LEURS OFFICIERS SUPÉRIEURS À UN CAMP OU L’AUTRE ?

Non, très peu, à moins qu’on ne leur ordonne de comparaître devant ceux-ci, et en passant, j’ai apporté toute une liasse d’ordres permanents au musée de la guerre en 1986. Bob Boyd était notre commis d’état-major, et il a ramené a la maison avec lui – je ne sais pas comment il a fait pour les conserver toutes ces années – mais il a ramené les ordres permanents incomplets – du 4 ou 5 décembre 1941 à janvier 1943. Quand il a été transféré au Japon, il les a apporté au Japon et jusqu’au Canada. Il était à l’hôpital Deer Lodge et j’ai été lui rendre visite et il m’a dit ce qu’il avait, et il a dit: « Je ne sais pas quoi faire avec ça » – il était célibataire et sans famille. Je lui ai que les papiers devraient aller au musée. J’ai dit « je pars en voyage à Ottawa. Si tu veux, je vais les apporter. » Et c’est là qu’ils ont fini. Richard Mallot était le conservateur à cette époque et il les a photocopiés et m’en a envoyé une copie; je l’ai encore. Mais les originaux ont tous été préservés dans le Musée de la guerre – pas dans le Musée de la guerre en tant que tel, mais dans l’entrepôt.

DONC CES ORDRES PERMANENTS VENAIENT DES OFFICIERS SUPÉRIEURS.

Oh oui, du colonel Trist, et vous y verrez un grand nombre de promotions, un grand nombre de rétrogradations, un grand nombre de coupes de paies des hommes, des interdictions de sortir des casernes – différentes infractions commises ou prétendument commises et pour lesquelles on avait prononcé une condamnation. Mais aucune des coupes de paie ni aucun des autres ordres n’a été mis en œuvre quand nous sommes rentrés au pays.

A-T-ON ÉTABLI DE VRAIS TRIBUNAUX D’ENQUÊTE POUR LES INFRACTIONS ALORS QUE VOUS ÉTIEZ DANS LE CAMP ?

Oh non, non, non. On se présentait devant le commandant, comme dans l’armée. On se faisait parader devant son commandant et condamner – c’est ce qui se passait. C’était peut-être pour avoir volé quelque chose à quelqu’un ou pour avoir injurié un officier ou quelque chose de ce genre. Les soldats se faisaient condamner pour ça.

CELA A CONTINUÉ TANT QUE VOUS ÉTIEZ DANS LE CAMP ?

Oh oui, encore une fois, cela faisait partie de la discipline que Sutcliffe avait mise en place avant sa mort – en d’autres termes, ce qui était nécessaire. Certaines des rétrogradations et des promotions qui ont eu lieu à l’époque du colonel Trist après la mort de Sutcliffe étaient, selon moi – je ne dirai pas inutile – mais pas vraiment nécessaires. Et quelques-unes des promotions qu’il a ordonnées après notre rentrée au pays ont été effectuées, certains de ces gars ont été promus caporaux et caporaux suppléants et ne se sont jamais fait payer pour cela à leur retour au pays.

À SHAM SHUI PO, LES RATIONS ALIMENTAIRES SE SONT-ELLES AMÉLIORÉES PAR RAPPORT À NORTH POINT ?

Pas dans une grande mesure, non. C’était plus ou moins la même chose. La seule chose qui s’est améliorée était que si nous sortions travailler dans ces années-là, on nous donnait un pain supplémentaire. Afin d’obtenir cette brioche supplémentaire, plusieurs d’entre nous qui n’aurions pas dû sortir travailler, y sommes allés néanmoins.

EN FAIT, À SHAM SHUI PO, ON S’ATTENDAIT À CE QUE LES PRISONNIERS TRAVAILLENT ?

Oh oui; c’était différent de North Point à Sham Shui Po. Il fallait qu’un certain nombre d’hommes aillent travailler, même si c’était en civière.

QUEL GENRE DE TRAVAIL ÉTAIT-CE ?

Eh bien, lorsque ce fut le temps pour moi de travailler, on avait terminé la construction de la piste aérienne et nous devions aplatir une colline. Ils voulaient étendre l’aéroport à cette colline et à la colline du cimetière cérémonial chinois, et les Chinois refusaient d’y travailler parce qu’elle était pleine de caveaux funéraires. Et nous avons commencé avec de petites charrettes sur un chemin de fer à voie étroite – un chariot à quatre roues, nous le chargions de pelletées de terre et le poussions jusqu’en bas pour ensuite le décharger. Comme nous aplatissions la colline, plus loin, la pente était plus raide et plus longue. À la fin, il y avait des blocs pour arrêter la charrette et nous étions censés la faire descendre sous contrôle; eh bien, avec quatre hommes affectés au chariot et qui le retenaient, même là, parfois, il glissait inutilement et on le laissait aller et il frappait le pied de la colline et se vidait. Mais nos officiers ne travaillaient pas. Et je me souviendrai toujours de Len Corrigan, le lieutenant Corrigan de Swift Current : il a enlevé sa désignation d’officier, et lui et Blackwood et quelques autres se sont habillés en soldats et sont toujours allés travailler. J’étais membre de son équipe de travail un jour et il a dit: « Écoutez, vous les gars qui ne veulent pas travaillez, assoyez-vous et reposez-vous, soyez aux aguets pour la garde qui arrive, » et chaque fois que les gardes venaient, ils nous appelaient et nous nous remettions au travail. Mais Corrigan faisait la plupart du pelletage dans ce chariot. Il était un maudit bon officier. Il était un officier de renfort – il nous a rejoints quand nous sommes revenus de la Jamaïque.

COMBIEN D’HEURES PASSIEZ-VOUS À TRAVAILLER SUR L’AÉROPORT DE KAI TAK ?

D’après ce que je me rappelle, nous nous levions vers 5 h ou 5 h 30 et nous prenions notre petit déjeuner – un bol de riz – et ensuite nous nous rendions au traversier, nous faisions le tour du port jusqu’à Kai Tak et nous travaillions. Nous étions de retour au camp vers 18 h 30 ou 19 h, pour souper et aller se coucher. Puis, c’était à recommencer le lendemain matin.

DONC, QUELQUE PART ENTRE 8 ET 10 HEURES ?

Oui, oh oui – je ne dirai pas que c’était du travail continu, mais nous étions en place pour travailler de huit à dix heures par jour.

VOUS MANGIEZ LE BOL DE RIZ QUE VOUS AVEZ MENTIONNÉ ?

Oui, on nous réveillait avec une soupe verte ou un ragoût ou quoi que ce soit ce jour-là.

ET PUIS AU DÉJEUNER ?

On nous donnait un petit pain.

ET À LA FIN DE LA JOURNÉE ?

Un autre bol de riz ou de céréales et encore de l’horreur verte.

DONC, VU LE RÉGIME ALIMENTAIRE QU’ON VOUS DONNAIT PENDANT UNE JOURNÉE NORMALE ET LES 8 OU 10 HEURES PASSÉES À FAIRE DU TRAVAIL MANUEL, QUELS EN ÉTAIENT LES EFFETS SUR LA SANTÉ DES HOMMES ?

Eh bien, plusieurs d’entre nous trouvaient cela difficile, mais mettons que mon corps a semblé perdre tout ce poids et descendre à un point où je ne dirai pas que je recevais suffisamment de nourriture, mais j’ai cessé de perdre du poids et j’ai pu continuer. Mon corps ne semblait pas avoir besoin du même montant. C’était mon impression.

MAIS PENDANT CE TEMPS LA PLUPART DES HOMMES OU PLUSIEURS D’ENTRE EUX SOUFFRAIENT DE DYSENTERIE OU DE DIARRHÉE.

Oh oui, eh bien, n’importe qui atteint de dysenterie, même moi-même, à travailler là-bas, il fallait aller aux toilettes cinq ou six fois par jour pour nous soulager et tout ce qui restait, c’était du mucus.

QUELLES AUTRES MALADIES SE SONT DÉVELOPPÉES CHEZ LES HOMMES À CETTE ÉPOQUE ?

Eh bien, même avant que nous partions de North Point, la diphtérie s’était déclarée; deux ou trois hommes ont fait la route de Bowen atteints de diphtérie, donc, lorsque nous avons déménagé au Camp Sham Shui Po, la diphtérie était en plein essor. Et une autre fois, ma vie a été sauvée vers le milieu d’octobre. Je n’ai pas travaillé à Kai Tek très longtemps. Vers le milieu d’octobre, nous sommes rentrés une nuit et le sergent-major Caldwell m’a appelé à sa chambre à la fin et a dit, je veux que vous fassiez du bénévolat à l’hôpital pour diphtériques. Vous savez ce que j’ai dit? « Pas moyen, je me fais donner un petit pain supplémentaire grâce au travail »; et il a dit, « si vous ne faites pas de bénévolat, je vais vous porter volontaire de toute façon. » Et j’y suis allé. Encore une fois, je remercie toujours Bert Caldwell et même aujourd’hui, si je ne m’étais pas rendu là-bas à l’hôpital pour diphtériques pour y travailler comme préposé aux soins, je n’aurais peut-être pas survécu au travail. J’ai fini par attraper la diphtérie, vers le milieu de décembre, mais heureusement pour moi, il y avait assez de médicaments et mon cas était bénin. Le capitaine Gray a commandé une injection d’anatoxine qui m’a sauvée la vie. Comme je le disais plus tôt, j’ai toujours remercié Bert Caldwell après ça, parce que s’il ne m’avait pas retiré du groupe de travail, je n’aurais peut-être pas survécu. J’ai travaillé dans cet hôpital jusqu’à ce que je sois atteint de diphtérie moi-même et puis enfin, la diphtérie s’est en allée. J’ai travaillé à l’hôpital jusqu’à la fin, jusqu’à ce qu’ils le ferment. Il n’y avait plus de nouveaux cas.

Dites-moi, M. Atkinson, pendant ce temps, combien d’hommes sont morts à cause de l’épidémie de diphtérie ?

Oh, je dirais 60, peut-être 70 hommes sont morts de diphtérie. Un grand nombre est mort à cause de la dysenterie à la même époque. Là, je travaillais à l’hôpital pour diphtériques, au Jubilee Building, et nous avions un pavillon pour la dysenterie et j’ai travaillé le quart de nuit avec Ron Claricoates, Larry Furlotte et Pat Poirier – nous étions l’équipe de nuit dans cet hôpital. Mais Claricoates et moi étions affectés au pavillon de la dysenterie et c’était ce que nous voulions. Nous avions des gars là atteints de dysenterie et de diphtérie en même temps et un gars dont je me souviens était le Grenadier Foxall – nous devions les aider à se nourrir – et il avait besoin de la bassine toute la nuit. Nous l’avons installé sur la bassine et avons fini de le nourrir. Habituellement, ils appelaient faiblement une fois qu’ils avaient fini; et c’est peut-être de ma faute – je ne suis pas revenu assez tôt – mais ça n’avait aucune d’importance de toute façon. Nous sommes allés vérifier son état, et il était mort sur la bassine. Ce sont des choses qu’on n’oublie jamais.

Dites-moi, M. Atkinson, les installations et traitements médicaux nécessaires étaient-ils disponibles aux hommes ?

Non. Il y avait très peu de médicaments et je ne sais même pas comment la première anatoxine est entrée dans le camp. Mais je sais que les médecins ont fait un travail extraordinaire avec ce qu’ils pouvaient obtenir. Cette histoire que j’ai est de seconde main : un ou deux des Japonais avait attrapé la gonorrhée ou la syphilis et voulaient que nos médecins les guérissent sur place, parce que cela portait vraiment atteinte à l’armée japonaise, et en guérissant les Japonais, nous avons supposément obtenu certains médicaments, et nous pouvons remercier Crawford et les médecins pour cela. L’anatoxine étaient dans la colonie, mais les Japonais ne voulaient pas la fournir.

SERAIT-CE VOTRE ÉVALUATION QU’AVEC DE BONS SOINS MÉDICAUX ET UNE ALIMENTATION ADÉQUATE, CES HOMMES NE SERAIENT PAS MORTS ?

Un grand, grand nombre ne serait pas mort. C’est une théorie que j’ai, connaissant les chiffres. Nous avions – mettons nos gens en trois groupes – nous avions de jeunes hommes célibataires, certains d’entre eux âgés de 16 ans tout au plus, d’autres de jusqu’à 30 ans, toujours célibataires. Nous avions un groupe d’hommes mariés – certains âgés tout au plus de 20 ans – peu avec des enfants, mais certains de 25 à 40 ans qui avaient de jeunes familles à la maison; et nous avions le groupe plus âgé, dont certains étaient jusque dans la soixantaine chez les Grenadiers, qui étaient mariés mais dont les familles avaient déjà grandi. Là, de ce groupe, lorsque j’y pense, le plus grand nombre de décès a eu lieu chez les hommes mariés âgés de 21 à 40 ans qui avaient de jeunes familles à la maison. Leurs pensées lorsqu’ils étaient malades étaient : « est-ce que je vais rentrer à la maison et les revoir ». La seule famille que j’avais à la maison, c’était ma mère, mon beau-père et mes sœurs. Je n’avais pas les mêmes soucis que mon frère. Il était marié avec une famille. Il est mort dans le camp. Walt Fryatt est mort au Bowan Road Hospital; le sergent Fryatt – il venait de Brandon – était un ancien combattant de la Première Guerre mondiale. Walt est mort, comment dirais-je, je ne dirais pas de solitude, mais du fait qu’il était loin de sa famille et ne pensait pas qu’il puisse jamais revenir à la maison. Ce fut le cas d’un grand nombre dans ce groupe d’âge.

DONC, LES FACTEURS PSYCHOLOGIQUES...

Les facteurs psychologiques – c’est ma façon de penser – ont beaucoup eu à voir là-dedans. Et si quelqu’un le vérifiait, je pense qu’ils trouveraient peut-être que j’ai raison.

PENDANT CES MOIS TERRIBLES LORSQUE L’ÉPIDÉMIE DE DIPHTÉRIE ÉTAIT EN PLEINE EFFERVESCENCE, IL Y AVAIT D’AUTRES MALADIES AUSSI.

Oh oui, la dysenterie, le béribéri sec, nous avons tout vu. Des plaies de pellagre aussi – ce que la diphtérie a fait était d’ouvrir une zone d’isolement dans le camp. Les gens qui étaient porteurs mais ne développeraient jamais la diphtérie – mon frère était l’un d’entre eux – ont été mis en isolement. Et je suppose que c’est comment j’ai attrapé la diphtérie : on nous interdisait de le faire, mais j’allais visiter mon frère tous les deux jours en quarantaine et je pense que c’est comme ça que je l’ai eue. Je ne l’ai pas eu des patients à l’hôpital, je l’ai eu dans le service de contagieux. Mon frère et moi avons décidé, lorsque les soldats partaient pour le Japon en 1943 en janvier, qu’au moment du prochain détachement à destination du Japon, nous irions ensemble.

POURQUOI ?

Eh bien, je ne dirai pas qu’un changement est aussi bénéfique que le repos, mais les conditions peuvent être différentes. En juillet 1943, mon frère a fini par aller au Bowen Road Hospital, car on a diagnostiqué un problème au niveau de la mastoïde – à l’oreille, et il est allé à l’hôpital et je ne l’ai jamais revu. Nous nous sommes écrits quelques notes, passées en contrebande. Il est décédé le 5 octobre 1943 – j’étais au Japon. Les médecins avaient tout essayé pour me faire entrer dans les services de l’hôpital à travailler de nouveau comme préposé aux malades, mais on devait envoyer un nombre minimum de soldats au Japon et je pouvais traverser la place d’armes de 50 verges sans trébucher, donc je devais aller au Japon.

Est-ce la façon dont ils ont choisi les hommes ?

Ils nous alignaient et nous obligeaient à marcher, et on faisait sortir de la ligne tous ceux qui ne pouvaient pas marcher. C’était par élimination lente et c’est la façon dont j’ai fini par aller au Japon.

PARLEZ-MOI DU VOYAGE AU JAPON.

Nous étions sur un – j’appellerais ça un bat-la-houle – notre cale avant renfermait environ 300 hommes, l’arrière le même nombre. Notre cale avant ne renfermait que des Grenadiers et des Rifles – des Canadiens. La cale arrière était un mélange de Canadiens et de quelques Britanniques. Nous sommes entrés dans la nôtre et c’était une coque à franc-bord. Dans un coin du bunker où nous étions, il y avait un peu de charbon. Si vous montiez sur le charbon vous glissiez constamment vers le bas. Nous nous asseyions sur le sol et le gars derrière nous – nous étions assis les genoux contre le dos de quelqu’un. Il n’y avait nulle part où s’étendre. C’est la façon dont nous nous sommes rendus – nous avons voyagé de cette façon à partir du 15 août pendant trois jours à Taipei à Taïwan, Formosa, et nous étions dans le port de Formosa – à Taipei – pendant près de 10 jours. Mais tous les soirs du voyage, ils fermaient l’écoutille. Et alors que nous étions à Taipei, ils l’ont laissé ouverte et mis en place un entonnoir en toile pour laisser passer un peu d’air – il faisait une chaleur étouffante. Le seul répit qu’on nous a donné était de permettre à 10 hommes d’aller aux toilettes, et c’était un endroit construit sur le côté du bateau où on s’assoyait et on se laissait aller. Certaines personnes souffrant de dysenterie faisaient ça et il y avait un seau vide au bas de l’escalier. Il était en utilisation continue, et quand il était plein quelqu’un le montait et le vidait. Lorsque nous avons quitté le camp, ils nous ont donné un certain nombre de petits pains comme nourriture. Au fil du temps, ils ont moisi. Même si on en coupait la moisissure, ils n’étaient pas mangeables. Mais à ce point-là, ils faisaient cuire du riz et un certain mélange de ragoût – très peu savoureux. Dans certains cas, c’était du poisson pas tout à fait cuit. Nous sommes restés à Taipei, comme je l’ai dit, pendant 10 jours. Le seul répit qu’on nous donnait était d’aller sur le pont peut-être deux fois par jour en groupes pour faire une pause et aller aux toilettes. Ils ont apporté à bord du navire un fruit appelé pomelo – c’est environ trois fois la taille d’un pamplemousse et la chair est comme de la chair de pamplemousse, mais c’est beaucoup plus grand. Il était sucré, mais très rugueux. C’était quelque chose de différent. Ceux qui avaient mal aux lèvres les sentaient brûler; si les lèvres étaient fendillées, l’acide les gerçait. Lorsque cela se produisait, la diarrhée s’ensuivait et les toilettes étaient occupées toute la journée. Puis, nous sommes partis de là et nous avons atterri à Osaka. Je suppose qu’ils attendaient d’avoir assez de navires pour un convoi. Nous sommes restés près de la côte de la Chine tout le long, puis nous sommes faufilés à travers la partie inférieure de la mer du Japon jusqu’à Osaka. Les dates – Je ne peux pas vous dire les dates exactes – ce serait près du 2 ou du 3 septembre 1943. Ils nous ont mis en rangs et nous ont séparés en deux groupes – notre groupe a fini par aller à Niigata. Notre voyage en train a duré presque toute la nuit. Nous avions déjà beaucoup travaillé – mais c’est à ce moment-là que le vrai travail d’esclave a commencé.

QUAND VOUS ÊTES ARRIVÉS À NIIGATA, QUEL ÉTAIT LE NOM DU CAMP ?

Nous étions dans le camp 5B. Les Canadiens avaient été divisés en équipes : de fonderie, de triage du charbon, de Shitutsu, de triage du charbon Reinko et du chantier naval Mirasu. Notre équipe du chantier naval comptait 50 hommes. Nous étions débardeurs. Heureusement pour moi, encore une fois c’était quelque chose qui m’a sauvé la vie. L’équipe de triage du charbon – oh, elle devait compter 150 hommes, et ce qui restait des trois cent hommes étaient membres de l’équipe de fonderie. Je peux seulement relater quelques cas des deux autres équipes, mais en ce qui concerne l’équipe du chantier naval – Je suis débardeur et voleur chevronné – nous chargions la nourriture et tout le reste et nous avons volé notre part; et nous avons pris nos coups pour avoir volé quand nous nous faisions prendre, mais nous avons réussi à voler beaucoup plus que ce dont on s’est aperçu. Il y avait là un vieux Japonais à qui je dois accorder le crédit qui lui est dû. Il s’appelait Sibiason – nous l’appelions « Seabiscuit ». Il avait gardé les déclarations britanniques de la Première Guerre mondiale parce que les Japonais étaient leurs alliés à ce moment-là. Il était fier de ces documents, mais il nous a toujours dit qu’il était japonais et son pays était en guerre, et c’était pourquoi il devait être comme il était. Nous avons perdu la coupe quand nous avons eu Sibiason – mais ça, c’est une autre histoire. Quand il s’en allait, si une charge de fèves arrivait, on en détournait un sac jusqu’à la cabane qui nous servait de salle à manger, parce qu’ils nous ont dit, si nous allions transporter des sacs de 90 kilos de fèves soja à partir du quai jusqu’au wagon, nous pouvions bien nous servir. Ceux d’entre nous qui avons survécu à l’équipe du chantier naval recevions, tous les jours à midi, en plus de la petite ration de riz, une boîte de lait en poudre pleine de fèves soja cuites. En fait, elles étaient si bonnes que Sibiason a affecté un de nos hommes là-bas en tant que cuisinier permanent à la cabane qui servait de cuisine – et je pense que c’est peut-être pourquoi je suis comme je suis aujourd’hui. La quantité de protéines que nous avons reçu des fèves soja à ce moment-là – et je ne peux pas vous dire combien de personnes de l’équipe du chantier naval de Niiagata sont encore en vie – Je crois que nous sommes beaucoup plus nombreux que les autres. C’était un camp difficile. Il y a 137 tombes à Tokyo. Deux d’entre elles appartiennent à un membre des Forces aériennes et à un membre de la Marine qui sont morts vers la fin de la guerre. Les 135 autres sont des Canadiens qui sont morts dans les camps de prisonniers au Japon. De ces derniers, 74 viennent de Niigata.

COMMENT CES HOMMES MOURRAIENT-ILS, DANS LA PLUPART DES CAS ?

Le manque de médicaments, l’absence de traitement, les coups, le travail forcé, le régime alimentaire – c’est la seule façon dont je peux le décrire.

À 5B, POUVEZ-VOUS ME DIRE SI LES RATIONS S’ÉTAIENT AMÉLIORÉES COMME VOUS L’ESPÉRIEZ ?

Non, jamais. Je vais relater un incident – du 31 décembre 1943 au 1er janvier 1944, l’une de nos huttes s’est effondrée sur nous. Ils n’utilisent pas de clous dans la construction de leurs charpentes – ils utilisent un trou carré et une cheville carrée. Le camp avait été construit sur le flanc d’une colline de sable. Tout ce qu’ils avaient utilisé comme fondation était un rocher et ils avaient mis une bûche de six pouces sur cela pour tenir en place le grand poteau central de 18 pouces. À cette époque, les Américains étaient arrivés dans le camp. Les Canadiens étaient d’un côté et les Américains de l’autre. Nous dormions dans des couchettes superposées, avec un plancher de terre battue. J’ai toujours dit que c’était un rêve, mais la réalité a été que le bois s’est écrasé sur nous. Je me suis réveillé et tout ce que je pouvais entendre était le grondement, l’écrasement et le crépitement du bois. Nous avions été en train d’empiler des pommes et des oranges ce jour-là – je ne pense pas que je me souvienne exactement – et la pile s’effondra et c’était le bois qui l’écrasait. Tout d’un coup, j’ai été frappé et c’est la dernière chose dont je me souviens. La première chose dont je me souviens en reprenant connaissance était Matt Hawes, Ed Arseneau et Walter Jenkins essayant de m’extirper du bois, comme pour quelques gars à côté de moi, mais ils ont finalement obtenu une scie et l’ont coupé pour pouvoir le soulever. J’ai eu le bassin écrasé – ce fut le cas de six d’entre nous. Nous avons perdu huit hommes, tous tués par ce même poteau. Ils avaient tous la poitrine écrasée. Nous avons dormi la tête contre le mur cette nuit-là. Il y avait Atkinson, Dame, Tex Hicks, Jerry Maberly, Ray Pellor – ah, qui donc était l’autre; J’ai une liste de tous ces gars-là – nous avons tous eu le bassin écrasé. Joe Gurski était l’autre. Trois d’entre eux ont été mis en plâtres, mais dans le cas de trois d’entre nous, on ne pouvait pas trouver de fractures en utilisant la machine à rayons X. On n’a pas trouvé de fractures en m’examinant, mais lorsque je suis rentré au pays j’ai découvert que les deux os du bassin avaient été écrasés. Huit hommes ont été tués et six d’entre nous blessés de cette façon. Nous étions le 1er janvier 1944 et j’étais allongé sur le dos, les genoux sur un sac de paille, jusqu’au mois de mars. Un médecin américain que les Japonais avaient fait venir de Tokyo est entré et nous a dit que si nous n’allions pas nous lever, nous redresser les jambes et commencer à marcher, nous ne nous pourrions plus jamais marcher. Ils ont retiré mon sac de jute de sous moi et mes jambes se sont effondrées; je ne pouvais pas les bouger. Je me suis retourné et j’ai rampé vers la porte – le côté caserne était de deux pieds plus haut que le sol de boue et le long d’un mur, il y avait comme une rampe. J’ai finalement eu le courage de me lever et m’agripper à la rampe et j’ai essayé de marcher, mais je ne pouvais pas le faire. Cependant, chaque matin, et deux fois par jour, je me levais pour le faire et en quelques semaines, je me promenais avec deux bâtons. À la fin de mars, j’étais de retour au sein de mon équipe du chantier naval de Niigata – j’étais de retour au travail. Depuis mon retour au pays, je me suis fait opérer la hanche gauche en 1990, et la hanche droite en 1995. Cela a pris de notre retour au pays jusqu’en 1989 avant que je n’obtienne une pension à cause de mes hanches. En 1956 – j’ai mon propre dossier – le radiologue à Deer Lodge, selon ses recommandations au médecin, était de l’avis que la saillie osseuse sur mon os iliaque droite – qui est exactement comme les jointures de vos doigts – était sans doute due à la malnutrition infantile. Je n’ai pas vu ce dossier pendant des années, mais j’ai finalement rassemblé des informations sur mon propre dossier – J’ai mon propre dossier sur moi-même. S’il travaillait toujours lorsque j’ai obtenu ces renseignements, j’aurais été le frapper sur la tête (rires) – parce que c’étaient mes hanches et je savais ce qui s’était passé. Tout ce qu’on avait à faire était de palper le bassin, là où il avait été écrasé et ça pinçait comme ça – c’est là que l’os du bassin est une courbe, le mien pinçait comme ça, comme les jointures des doigts. Cela m’a blessé la colonne vertébrale; à Charlottetown, pendant des années, les conseillers médicaux là-bas mettaient dans les rapports que la colonne vertébrale ne peut pas être blessée par un coup horizontal; il doit y avoir un coup vertical. Mon médecin orthopédiste – Je ne vais pas utiliser les mêmes termes que lui – a dit que ma colonne vertébrale inférieure, la région lombaire de la colonne vertébrale, a été gravement endommagée quand j’ai eu le bassin écrasé. Il a dit qu’il ne pouvait pas croire qu’un médecin interprète mon cas de cette façon s’il avait lu l’histoire de ce qui s’est passé. Mais de toute façon, c’est de l’histoire ancienne. Je suis ici et je suis vivant et je me bats pour tous les cas de fonds de retraite et de bien-être social pour les anciens combattants et j’aime le faire. Ne me demandez pas d’autre chose; je connais les pensions et le bien-être social – je ne peux pas vous dire ce qui s’est passé hier, je ne peux pas vous dire le nom d’une personne ou de l’autre – mais j’en sais assez sur les pensions et le bien-être social pour me battre.

RETOURNONS AU CAMP 5B À NIIGATA.

Désolé, j’ai perdu le fil de mes idées.

NON, PAS DU TOUT – PAS DU TOUT. QUELS SONT VOS SOUVENIRS AU SUJET DES GARDES LÀ-BAS ?

Ils étaient durs.

Quand vous dites durs, comment les décririez-vous – étaient-ils plus sévères qu’à Sham Shui Po ?

Oh oui, la garde supérieure, les sous-officiers supérieurs – une partie des grand manitous, comme nous les appelions – les civils venaient nous emmener travailler et il y avait un gars, qui portait différents noms – Pistol Pete, Cyclone Pete – son nom japonais m’échappe, mais je crois qu’il était sergent-major, sous le commandant de notre camp; il restait dans le camp et une nuit nous sommes revenus du travail, c’était en 1945, et Taffy Richards, un Anglais en provenance de Tokyo, est arrivé à notre camp, avec un certain nombre d’autres hommes. Nous étions en trois rangs et lorsque nous sommes entrés – Cyclone Pete était allé à Tokyo la veille, et quand il était en service nous étions tous fouillés quand nous arrivions du travail, mais il était parti, donc nous avons pensé que nous étions saufs. Nous avions chacun sur soi un sac de butin de fèves soja crues. Nous sommes rentrés et nous nous sommes avancés pour le bango [l’énumération] pour l’appel, et qui sortait du bureau ? C’était Cyclone Pete. Il grimpa son monticule – il était si court qu’il se servait d’un petit monticule pour qu’il puisse regarder les hommes de haut. Nous savions ce qui allait se produire. Il avait un gars avec lui. Nous avons ouvert nos rangs et les gardes nous ont fouillés. Lorsque le garde est descendu dans notre rang, j’ai pris ma tasse de gamelle et je l’ai tendue devant moi en poussant mon havresac derrière moi. J’avais ma veste sur l’épaule et Taffy Richards était dans la rangée derrière moi – eh bien, quand le garde a fouillé son sac et trouvé les fèves soja – il a dit « qu’est-ce que c’est ça, espèce de salaud ? » et il a reculé. Quand il a reculé, il m’a frappé et ma veste est tombée lorsque le gardien était en train de fouiller le gars à côté de moi, et il a pris mon sac et en a tiré mon butin. Eh bien, nous avons regardé Cyclone Pete et il tapait des mains, car il allait montrer à son ami de Tokyo comment il gérait les prisonniers de guerre. Ils ont laissé partir les autres – ils ne les ont jamais fouillés – une fois qu’ils nous eurent attrapés, c’est tout ce qu’ils voulaient. Cyclone Pete nous tenait au garde-à-vous et a commencé par Taffy Richards, le frappant avec ses poings. Comme je le disais, j’ai eu de la chance en ce sens. Nous nous sommes tenus debout et il a fallu le prendre. Si nous tombions au sol, ils nous donnaient des coups de pieds, donc nous nous préparions et absorbions ces premiers coups. Puis, il alla chercher un peu d’encre noire ou de la peinture – ce dont ils se servaient pour leur écriture – et en caractères japonais, il nous a écrit « VOLEURS » sur le front, et nous sommes restés au garde-à-vous devant le poste de garde toute la nuit. Notre seul répit – nous l’avons appris des autres gars – était d’appeler les gardes et dire qu’il fallait aller aux toilettes. Il fallait courir. Le garde nous suivait avec son fusil, sa baïonnette – il fallait faire sa besogne, revenir et se remettre au garde-à-vous. L’équipe du chantier naval est sortie le lendemain matin pour aller travailler et nous avons pensé qu’il nous faudrait rester près du poste de garde; mais non, on nous a dit de nous mettre en rang. Nous nous sommes mis en rang, sommes partis travailler – sans petit déjeuner – avons travaillé et quand nous sommes revenus, Matt Hawes a expliqué la situation. Il avait appris à parler le japonais assez bien, il était un de nos sergents et Dieu merci, car il nous a sauvé la peau souvent là-bas, comme lorsque nous étions au Japon. Sibiason nous a regardé le front et a vu « voleurs » et il a dit « Matt, qu’est-ce qui s’est passé ? » Matt lui dit que nous avions été surpris à voler des fèves soja et le vieux Sibiason a ri. Vous savez ce qu’il a fait ? Il a dit à Richards et moi d’aller dans la cabane qui servait de salle à manger et de dormir. Matt lui avait dit que nous n’avions pas eu de petit déjeuner et que nous avions passé toute la nuit debout et c’est pourquoi je dis que Sibiason était un bon gardien, un bon civil. Cependant, Cyclone Pete ou Pistol Pete ou qui que ce soit, si jamais j’aurais eu la chance de le revoir après notre libération... mais il a disparu, il a décollé. Le commandant du camp aussi : ils ont décollé du camp.

IL S’AGISSAIT D’UN INCIDENT QUI VOUS EST ARRIVÉ PERSONNELLEMENT, M. ATKINSON. AVEZ-VOUS ÉTÉ TÉMOIN D’AUTRES INCIDENTS ?

Je ne me souviens pas le nom du jeune homme des Middlesex, mais il était celui qui était venu de Tokyo pour nous rejoindre, et un jour au travail, il a décidé qu’il ne travaillerait plus pour les Japonais. Et il s’est assis, tout simplement. Là, ni les gardes, ni les civils ne l’ont battu, mais quand il est arrivé au camp cette nuit-là, notre salaud de commandant du camp est sorti et l’a battu avec son fourreau de sabre. Il l’a roué de coups, en fait il a commencé à lui donner des coups de pieds avec ses bottes. Le capitaine Parker, l’officier américain sous le major Fellows, est sorti en courant et a même poussé le commandant du camp pour le séparer du gars et lui a dit de le lâcher tranquille. Après ça, le commandant a commencé à battre Parker mais celui-ci n’est pas tombé. Mais il a sauvé ce jeune, j’en suis sûr; il lui a sauvé la vie. Nous subissions des raclées; par exemple, l’un d’eux se cacherait dans le noir et quand nous partions aux toilettes, il nous frappait avec la crosse de son fusil – ça ne m’est jamais arrivé, mais c’est arrivé à d’autres personnes. Ils adoraient venir dans la hutte, même lorsque nous mangions, et si nous ne nous mettions pas au garde-à-vous en les saluant, ils pourraient nous battre. C’étaient les gardes réguliers qui faisaient ça.

EST-IL JUSTE DE DIRE QUE CHAQUE FOIS QUE LES GARDES RÉGULIERS JAPONAIS ÉTAIENT LÀ, VOUS ÉTIEZ TOUJOURS MÉFIANTS ET ALERTES ?

Oh très, très. Nous étions en état d’alerte tout le temps, pas tellement à cause des gardes mais sur le chantier naval. L’équipe du chantier naval avait un homme, un civil japonais qu’on appelait The Shadow (l’ombre), parce qu’il faisait près de six pieds et il portait une cape noire et un chapeau noir. Vous ne vous souvenez pas de la revue The Shadow, vous êtes trop jeune, mais dans ces années-là, l’une des revues populaires était The Shadow. Avec Lamont Cranston : c’était une émission de radio – The Shadow Knows. C’était son nom. Un autre homme ressemblait à Henry Morgan, l’acteur de cinéma, et nous l’appelions mon oncle Henry. C’était Sibiason qui incarnait ce Shadow et nous l’ignorions, mais il connaissait un peu d’anglais. Il nous a fallu beaucoup de temps pour le découvrir. Il était en tête de l’équipe de travail affectée à l’entrepôt et quelqu’un était là en train de voler quelque chose. Quelqu’un se mettait à la porte de l’entrepôt et disait « The Shadow Knows » (L’ombre le sait !) et ils s’arrêtaient, cachaient leur sac de butin, et sortaient, ou disaient « bonjour, mon oncle Henry » – c’étaient là des signaux à tous ceux qui volaient et remplissaient des sacs de butin pour les gars.

VOUS VENEZ DE PARLER DES DIVERS MOYENS D’ALERTER LES GENS QUE LES JAPONAIS ARRIVAIENT. ÉTAIT-CE ASSEZ COMMUN, CE TYPE DE CHAPARDAGE QUE VOUS FAISIEZ ?

Dans l’équipe du chantier naval, oui. C’est peut-être une autre raison que j’ai la santé que j’ai aujourd’hui. N’importe quel membre de l’équipe du chantier naval en vie aujourd’hui est, sinon en assez bonne santé, du moins plus actif que certains autres anciens PG. Je peux vous donner un autre exemple. J’ai mentionné plus tôt le jeune Dubé. Dubé, comme je l’ai dit, éprouvait des difficultés à marcher, et les Japonais avaient l’habitude de le taquiner, mais encore une fois ce Shadow était responsable de notre groupe. Nous étions six : Bob McLeod, Pete Reisdorf, Dubé, Mike Frieson, Joe Skwarok et moi-même. Nous sommes allés à un entrepôt et nous devions charger des sacs de jute attachées en fagots à peu près ça de haut dans un wagon couvert. Eh bien, chaque fois que nous entrions dans un entrepôt, il fallait que nous trouvions qu’est-ce qu’on y entreposait. Dubé n’était pas toujours en forme, alors nous le mettions derrière la pile pour savoir ce qui était dans l’entrepôt. Le Shadow était absent et nous étions en train de travailler et il sortit, et a déclaré: « ces sacs ont du sucre dans les coins ». Alors il est resté là toute la journée à ouvrir les paquets avant que nous n’arrivions, à prendre le sucre mouillé des coins et à le mettre dans nos sacs à butin. Nous avons travaillé là-bas pendant deux jours. Le Shadow arrivait et disait « Dubé rien fait, Dubé rien fait » – Dubé était allé aux toilettes parce qu’il avait constamment la diarrhée et la dysenterie. Eh bien, la plupart des sacs qui sont allés dans les voitures du 2ème jour ont été nettoyés de tout sucre qui se trouvait dans les coins. Nous avons ramené ça en toute sécurité dans le camp et même les gars à l’hôpital en ont profité un peu. Presque tout le monde dans notre équipe de chantier naval en a eu, mais pas les Américains, qui avaient leur propre zone à couvrir. Les Canadiens l’ont partagé entre eux et une grande quantité se dirigea vers l’hôpital à Walt Campbell et au Dr Stewart pour les patients. Là, il était sale, mais c’était toujours du sucre. Il fallait travailler de cette façon.

M. ATKINSON, COMPTE TENU DE VOTRE DESCRIPTION DES CONDITIONS LÀ-BAS À NIIGATA, LE DUR LABEUR, LE MANQUE DE BONNE ALIMENTATION, LE MANQUE DE SOINS MÉDICAUX ADÉQUATS ET LE MANQUE DE NOUVELLES DU MONDE EXTÉRIEUR, LES HOMMES ONT-ILS ÉPROUVÉ DES DIFFICULTÉS À GARDER LE MORAL ?

Certains oui, et lorsque c’était le cas, ils ne sont pas revenus au pays. J’ai eu une théorie alors et je vis par cette même théorie aujourd’hui. Je ne me préoccupe pas de la semaine prochaine, du mois prochain ou de l’année prochaine. Je vis aujourd’hui pour que je puisse manger aujourd’hui et me réveiller demain. J’ai vécu de cette façon toute ma vie depuis le camp de prisonniers.

SI VOUS VOYIEZ DANS LE CAMP UN HOMME QUI COMMENÇAIT À DÉPRIMER OU SE DÉCOURAGER, QUE FAISAIENT LES AUTRES HOMMES ?

Nous essayions de lui changer les idées en lui parlant, en lui témoignant de notre amitié, pour qu’il ne se sente pas si seul, par exemple. Mais comme je l’ai dit plus tôt, de ceux d’entre eux qui sont devenus déprimés, très peu d’entre eux sont revenus à la maison. Dans ce camp 5B, je ne dirai pas la plupart, mais plusieurs de ces décès étaient attribuables à ce fait. Ils étaient malades, ils ne pouvaient obtenir aucun médicament, ils devaient exécuter des travaux forcés, et, dans certains cas, cela les affectait de ce point de vue-là.

LORSQUE VOUS SONGEZ À CETTE ÉPOQUE, Y AVAIT-IL UN DOUTE QUELCONQUE DANS L’ESPRIT D’AUCUN DES HOMMES QUE VOUS SERIEZ ÉVENTUELLEMENT LIBÉRÉS ?

Eh bien, à certains moments, nous nous posions la question. Lorsque de plus en plus de B29s sont apparus dans le ciel, nous savions que la fin allait venir. Mais nous ne nous y attendions pas, car nous croyions que ça serait vers Noël, pas quand c’est arrivé, le 14 août.

LES JAPONAIS VOUS ONT-ILS DIT CE QUI VOUS ARRIVERAIT ?

Il y a différentes histoires qui circulent sur Niigata et 5B. Selon ce dont je me souviens, nous sommes allés travailler dans la matinée du 14 aux chantiers navals. Juste après le déjeuner, deux gardes sont sortis et ont dit ‘situawari ‘ – nous sommes retournés dans le camp pour nous reposer, car nous devions porter du bois de chauffage à partir de la colline au-delà du camp. Les gars malades coupaient du bois. Nous sommes remontés. Le lendemain matin nous nous sommes levés et nous avons transporté des billots et je me souviens que les gardes étaient gentils; ils ont dit ‘situawari’ et nous riions et nous disions, « situawari, Amérique n° 1 : l’Amérique itchibon» et ils disaient « hei », oui, Amérique itchibon. Cela a duré si longtemps, quelqu’un est allé le dire à Ransom et au major Fellows, l’officier américain en tête du camp, et ils sont allés au bureau du commandant du camp et celui-ci a dit « oui, les combats ont cessé. » Eh bien, les gars ont pris le contrôle du camp illico. Le commandant a désarmé les gardes; il leur a laissé leurs fusils mais pas de baïonnettes ni de munitions. Le commandant du camp ne nous a pas parlé des bombes. Il craignait que les civils n’exercent des représailles contre la ville et il voulait que les gardes restent là armés de leurs fusils. Eh bien, en deux jours, même les fusils et les gardes étaient partis. Nous avons repris la ville de Niigata – la zone que nous connaissions.

LES PRISONNIERS SE SONT-ILS VENGÉS ?

Pas sur les civils, non. Il y a toutes sortes d’histoires sur ce qui est arrivé aux gardes – à Holy Joe, ou à Whiskers –  mais ces deux histoires sont fausses. Si vous parlez aux Américains, les actes ont été commis, mais rien n’est arrivé. Une histoire est qu’ils ont tiré la barbe de Wisker par les racines et quant à Holy Joe, ils lui ont donné des chaussures de ciment et l’ont jeté dans le port – mais les deux ont été obligés à comparaître devant le tribunal pour crimes de guerre. Cependant, je vous ai parlé de Cyclone Pete – Pistol Pete; nous avons eu un Yank du nom de – mautadit, son nom me reviendra – un boxeur, un bon boxeur, et on nous a conduits vers les trains et Cyclone Pete se promenait en souhaitant à chacun un voyage heureux et en leur serrant la main, et Smokey lui a asséné un coup et l’a assommé, en disant « ça fait deux ans que je voulais faire ça ». Il a enfin pu réaliser son souhait – il l’a complètement assommé. Smokey était un boxeur en temps de paix. Mais dans le cas des deux autres, rien n’est arrivé. Nous n’avions pas... notre joie d’être libérés était si grande, nous ne ressentions pas le besoin direct de manifester d’animosité envers aucun d’entre eux. La seule exception pour moi a été Tobiason, qui m’a battu au travail et a fini par entrer dans l’armée; je pense que le commandant du camp à l’époque s’est débarrassé de lui pour m’avoir battu comme ça. Je n’ai pas mentionné ça. Mais si nous étions jamais retournés au Japon ou il avait été là, je ne sais pas ce qui serait arrivé. Je voudrais revenir quelques années plus tard et le retrouver et lui rire au nez. Mais c’est à peu près tout.

PARLEZ-MOI MAINTENANT, M. ATKINSON, DE CET INCIDENT.

Eh bien, il y avait une fonderie de l’autre côté du canal où était la cabane qui nous servait de salle à manger, et nous avions un chemin de fer étroit avec de petites voitures. Périodiquement, quelques wagons arrivaient sur le train et on les chargeait d’une substance blanche – je l’appelait du soude toxique – c’était un composé blanc qu’on utilise dans la fonderie pour la fusion. Nous devions la pelleter dans les petites voitures à mettre sur la barge qui traverserait le canal sur le câble. La substance ne pouvait pas être mouillée, elle devait rester au sec. Tobiason leva les yeux vers le ciel. Nous étions en juillet, il allait pleuvoir, donc il a fait venir une bâche. Il a placé Matt Hawes à une extrémité des quatre voitures et moi à l’autre, et je suis allé dans le mauvais sens. Il m’a lancé des injures en japonais – ils ne peuvent pas prononcer la lettre D et parfois d’autres lettres, et mon nom était donc Haro; c’est ce que j’avais sur moi en caractères japonais. Il a dit : « Haro, viens ici » – J’ai une épée de bois, une copie exacte de ce qu’il a utilisé – il m’a frappé à la tête, sur les joues et sur les épaules, puis il m’a frappé à l’estomac avec cette épée. Ce n’était pas une véritable épée – elle était de bois, du genre qu’ils utilisent pour le kendo. J’ai perdu connaissance et quand je me suis réveillé, nous avions terminé le travail pour la journée. En arrivant cette nuit-là, Matt m’a appelé au premier rang avec lui et a demandé « qu’est-ce que tu vas faire » et je lui ai répondu « qu’est-ce que tu veux dire ». Il a dit, « tu sais que le nouveau commandant de camp a dit que si nous avions été maltraités au travail, il voulait le savoir ». J’ai dit « je ne sais pas; je me méfie ». Je ne voulais pas une autre raclée. Quoi qu’il en soit, nous sommes revenus au camp et après le souper, Matt a tout dit à Art France, l’interprète, et le major Fellows et eux sont allés voir le commandant du camp. Matt leur a raconté l’histoire. Ils sont venus me chercher. J’ai raconté la même histoire que Matt. Eh bien, dans les deux semaines Tobiason est disparu – l’armée l’avait recruté. Il était assez jeune pour joindre l’armée. Je ne sais pas si les coups qu’il m’a donnés ou si le fait que le commandant du camp avait dit que si nous étions maltraités il voulait le savoir, si tout cela avait eu une quelconque influence sur lui ou non. C’était peut-être son temps à être appelé; mais il a disparu, il était parti.

POUR EN REVENIR À LA FIN DE LA GUERRE, VOUS AVEZ DÉCRIT COMMENT SE SENTAIENT LES PRISONNIERS LÀ QUE LA GUERRE SE TERMINAIT. COMBIEN DE TEMPS S’EST ÉCOULÉ AVANT QUE VOUS NE SOYEZ RÉELLEMENT ÉVACUÉS ?

Eh bien, nous savions que la fin officielle de la guerre était le 15. Cette journée-là, en trois heures, des bombardiers en piqué s’envolant à partir des porte-avions nous ont largué des hamacs chargés de toutes sortes de choses, des préservatif (rires), des cigarettes; ils ont vidé la cantine, nous écrivant des notes pour nous dire que des B29s arriveraient dans un jour ou deux, et puis ils sont venus chargés de barils soudés ensembles avec des bouchons de bois et largués à l’aide de parachutes de couleur orange. Nous avons vécu comme des rois à partir de là jusqu’à notre départ de Niigata le 3 ou le 4 septembre. Nous avons pris le contrôle de la ville, nous avons pris le contrôle du camp, nous étions partout en campagne. Nous sommes allés à Tokyo et Yokohama – ils nous ont passés en revue sur les quais. Nous avons traversé un entrepôt, nous avons subi un examen médical, ils nous ont désinfectés au vaporisateur, nous avons pris une douche, ils nous ont désinfectés de nouveau et ils nous ont donnés des vêtements propres. J’ai reçu une tenue de Marine américain – un pantalon vert, une chemise verte, une veste verte – et tout ça, et ils nous ont mis sur un LSV – le navire de débarquement de véhicules USS Ozark. Ils y avaient chargé des lits partout, et même sur le pont supérieur. Le navire débordait de prisonniers de guerre. Le lendemain matin, on entendait dire sur les haut-parleurs « Attention, attention »... Ils ont appelé 25 Américains et 10 Canadiens par ordre alphabétique – Atkinson 1A, 4BC et 5C. Et tout de suite j’ai pensé oh, nous sommes de retour dans l’armée, c’est un service de corvée – et on nous a dit: « faites vos bagages, vous partez pour l’aéroport. » J’ai quitté le Japon le 6 ou le 7 septembre et j’étais chez moi à Winnipeg le 16 septembre. Nous dix avons été les premiers Canadiens à revenir au pays en provenance du Japon. J’ai des photos de notre arrivée à Vancouver – le lieutenant-gouverneur, le maire et tous les dignitaires et les officiers y étaient; et d’un bout à l’autre du pays, on nous a accueilli très chaleureusement. Mais j’étais le seul de Winnipeg. Il y avait trois Grenadiers et sept Rifles; les deux Grenadiers étaient des B, pas des A – il y avait Atkinson et Arseneau, puis Ernie Buck était l’autre Grenadier, mais ces deux-là vivaient au Nouveau-Brunswick et ils sont restés sur le train et sont rentrés chez eux. J’étais le seul – J’ai des photos de mon arrivée à Winnipeg. On voyait la curiosité des personnes qui voulait voir à quoi ressemblait un prisonnier de guerre. Dans cette rotonde de la gare du CFCP, il y avait des centaines de personnes. Je peux encore entendre les remarques. J’avais gagné du poids depuis les misérables 110 livres – ou peut-être un peu plus, peut-être 115 à partir de toutes ces fèves soja – que je pesais au moment où nous avions été libérés. Quand je suis arrivé à Winnipeg, je pesais 150 lb. Et je peux encore entendre les remarques des gens alors que je passais dans la foule : « il n’a pas l’air trop mince » – (rires). J’ai des photos de moi sur le train en train de fumer un cigare et oui, c’était un superbe retour à la maison, et je suis certainement content que mon nom commence par la lettre « A » – (rires).

MR. ATKINSON, DITES-MOI, QUAND VOUS SONGEZ À VOTRE EXPÉRIENCE DE LA BATAILLE DE HONG KONG ET DE L’INCARCÉRATION SUBSÉQUENTE DE PRESQUE 4 ANS, QUEL EFFET CETTE EXPÉRIENCE A-T-ELLE EU SUR VOUS PLUS TARD DANS LA VIE ?

Oh, j’ai en eu une expérience variée, je dirais. Je me suis marié et j’ai eu quatre enfants – un garçon et une fille, puis un garçon et une fille – une bonne famille. Je dis que j’avais le modèle, je savais comment faire (rires). Mes enfants me disent que j’étais un bon père, même si j’ai fini par boire beaucoup. Ils n’ont jamais manqué de rien. Cela n’a eu aucun effet sur moi, je ne peux pas dire que ça m’a fait boire comme j’ai bu; je pense que c’était plutôt le travail que j’avais qui m’a fait boire comme je le faisais. J’ai arrêté ça. Au moment de Noël chaque année, je ne dirais pas que j’étais déprimé, mais je devais me battre comme un diable pour me laisser gagner par l’esprit de Noël ou du Nouvel An. Mes enfants n’ont jamais pu comprendre, j’ai dû leur expliquer pourquoi je me sentais comme ça, parce que mon premier Noël à l’étranger, j’étais un prisonnier de guerre des Japonais; et à mesure qu’ils vieillissaient, ils ont commencé à en entendre davantage et ils ont commencé à comprendre pourquoi j’étais comme ça. J’ai surmonté ça aussi – je suis toujours un peu mélancolique autour de Noël, mais je sens que c’est naturel, beaucoup de gens se sentent de la même façon. Mais je sens que ça se rapporte à ces quatre années d’incarcération.

AVEZ-VOUS EU D’AUTRES PROBLÈMES PSYCHOLOGIQUES, COMME DES CAUCHEMARS DE CETTE ÉPOQUE ?

Oh, j’ai eu des cauchemars régulièrement, mais les 10 dernières années avant ma retraite, avant que je ne cesse de boire, je n’avais jamais eu à m’en inquiéter, car je n’étais jamais sobre. Je n’avais jamais de cauchemars. Mais cela n’a jamais dérangé mon travail, j’y allais chaque matin et je travaillais toute la journée. Mais ça, c’est une autre histoire. Mais non, j’ai un problème avec mes pieds parfois et pendant longtemps, je ne pouvais pas me coucher le soir avec les pieds couverts. Et maintenant, ils vont sauter périodiquement, ce qui me réveille. Mais je ne fais plus de mauvais rêves. J’ai surmonté ça après toutes ces années – j’ai surmonté ça.

QUE PENSEZ-VOUS DU PEUPLE JAPONAIS ?

Eh bien, je les ai placés en trois catégories. Nous avons nos Canadiens nés au Canada – les Canadiens dits d’origine japonaise. Je joue au golf avec certains d’entre eux à Winnipeg. Je suis désolé de ce qui leur est arrivé au Canada, mais il y avait une raison pour laquelle le gouvernement canadien les a transférés. Pour ce qui est des personnes au Japon, il y a deux catégories : il y a les personnes âgées et le gouvernement, et les jeunes qui ne savent rien de ce que le Japon a fait pendant la guerre. Ma rancune est contre le gouvernement actuel du Japon, le gouvernement de l’heure du Japon dans les années 1940 et les personnes âgées qui savaient ce qui s’était passé, mais ne veulent pas avouer l’atrocité qu’ils ont commise ou les choses qu’ils nous ont faites à nous comme prisonniers de guerre – pas seulement les Canadiens, mais tous les prisonniers de guerre.

QUE PENSEZ-VOUS DU GOUVERNEMENT DU CANADA QUI VOUS A ENVOYÉ À HONG KONG EN PREMIER LIEU ?

Eh bien, je peux raconter mon sentiment de la façon suivante : j’étais – je me suis engagé comme bénévole. Nous l’étions tous. Nous avons rejoint l’armée pour aller là où notre roi ou notre pays jugerait bon de nous envoyer. Ce fut notre sort d’être envoyés à Hong Kong, mais je ne peux absolument pas croire que mon gouvernement aurait dû m’envoyer sciemment – et ils le savaient, en effet – à un endroit où une des deux choses suivantes seulement devait se passer – je serais tué au combat ou fait prisonnier de guerre. Je ne leur ai jamais pardonné ça. Et pour ça, ils me doivent quelque chose. Et ils doivent quelque chose à tous nos gens qui restent; et si je réussis dans les deux prochaines années, j’espère obtenir une pension complète pour ceux qui reçoivent une pension de moins de 100% d’invalidité.

CELA FAIT PARTIE DE VOTRE EMPLOI ACTUEL ?

Oui, mon travail actuel.

AU POSTE DE PRESTATIONS ?

Je ne vivrai peux-être pas assez longtemps, mais j’aurai accompli la plus grande part du travail.

QUAND VOUS PENSEZ, M. ATKINSON, AUX HOMMES QUI ONT SERVI AVEC VOUS, LES JEUNES HOMMES COMME VOUS PARTIS FAIRE CE QUE LEUR PAYS VOULAIT QU’ILS FASSENT, QUAND VOUS PENSEZ À VOTRE EXPÉRIENCE COLLECTIVE, À QUOI PENSEZ-VOUS LORSQUE VOUS PENSEZ À CES HOMMES ?

Eh bien, je peux vous l’expliquer de cette façon : je suis allé à l’école secondaire Sisler à Winnipeg en 1986; on m’a demandé d’y aller la veille du jour du Souvenir et leur donner une conférence sur Hong Kong et sur la bataille. Une partie de cette conférence traitait de ma visite au cimetière de Sai Wan, et je leur ai dit que je suis vieil homme aujourd’hui, mais quand j’ai fait ce pèlerinage en 1985, et j’ai descendu les marches jusqu’à la section canadienne et j’ai vu les noms de mes copains sur ces pierres tombales – comme je l’ai dit aux enfants, certains d’entre eux étaient aussi jeunes ou plus jeunes que vous – qui sont morts, tués au combat ou dans les camps de prisonniers, c’est comme ça que les souvenirs me reviennent. Je leur ai dit, c’est sans doute difficile pour vous de comprendre ce que je ressens, ou quoi que ce soit, mais ces jeunes gens étaient là, tout simplement, comme vous l’êtes ici aujourd’hui. C’est à peu près la seule façon que je peux l’expliquer.

SI VOUS AVIEZ L’OCCASION DE PARLER À DE JEUNES CANADIENS DE PATRIOTISME ET DU DEVOIR, QUE LEUR DIRIEZ-VOUS ?

Eh bien, c’est difficile parce que nous avons traversé une période – depuis la Seconde Guerre mondiale – combien de décennies – de presque cinquante ans, où nous avons eu des personnes de quatre différents groupes d’âge qui n’ont jamais eu à songer à la guerre ou quoi que ce soit. La seule chose que je peux leur dire est ce que j’ai dit à un jeune gars, en 1995. Un journaliste de la presse – je pense que c’était le Toronto Star – m’a posé une question sur ce que je pensais de l’armée et je lui ai répondu : « selon le ton de votre voix, vous n’aimez pas notre système de défense nationale »; et il a dit « non, c’est vrai. » J’ai dit bien, je vais vous expliquer ça comme ça : Dieu merci qu’il existe beaucoup de personnes au Canada qui n’ont pas la même attitude que vous, car si jamais le Canada devait partir en guerre, nous n’aurions jamais d’armée, ou nous aurions une armée terrible si nous avions à en composer une avec des gens comme vous. C’est comme ça que je me suis exprimé. Je ne me souviens pas exactement de sa question, mais c’était ma réponse. Je me sens comme ça aujourd’hui; je ne voudrais pas voir un autre conflit, d’aucune manière que ce soit, mais nous avons besoin de Forces armées pour assurer notre sécurité, et je m’attends à... lorsque mes fils grandissaient, je leur disais toujours que... ils me demandaient comment je me sentirais si une autre guerre éclatait, et je leur ai dit : je m’attends à ce que vous fassiez la même chose que moi – vous engager et défendre votre pays. Et c’est ce que je peux dire aux jeunes d’aujourd’hui : si une guerre éclatait, le seul moyen que notre pays pourrait garder ses principes et son mode de vie, c’est si des individus comme vous, et vous, et vous étaient prêts à s’engager à le défendre. C’est la seule façon. Je ne pense pas que nous aurons jamais une autre guerre. Pas une guerre comme la Seconde Guerre mondiale; mais il y a des guerres en cours aujourd’hui. Les guerres ne s’arrêtent jamais.

M. ATKINSON JE VEUX QUE VOUS SACHIEZ QUE CELA A ÉTÉ UN HONNEUR ET UN PRIVILÈGE DE VOUS AVOIR PARLÉ CE MATIN. JE VEUX QUE VOUS SACHIEZ, MONSIEUR, QUE NOUS APPRÉCIONS BEAUCOUP QUE VOUS PRENIEZ LE TEMPS DE PARTAGER VOS SOUVENIRS DE VOTRE EXPÉRIENCE TANT DE LA BATAILLE DE HONG KONG QUE CELLE DES TERRIBLES ANNÉES QUI ONT SUIVI EN CAPTIVITÉ AUX MAINS DES JAPONAIS. JE VEUX QUE VOUS SACHIEZ, MONSIEUR, QUE NOUS APPRÉCIONS BEAUCOUP CE SERVICE QUE VOUS AVEZ RENDU AU CANADA À L’ÉPOQUE, ET NOUS APPRÉCIONS LE SERVICE QUE VOUS NOUS AVEZ RENDU AUJOURD’HUI. MERCI BEAUCOUP.

Eh bien, je vous remercie, M. Robinson, je vous remercie de l’occasion de le faire, parce que ce que cela signifie, c’est que ces expériences de guerre vont être disponibles d’une année à l’autre dans les écoles ou à tout autre organisme qui veut apprendre quelque chose sur l’histoire du Canada – il n’y a pas assez de ce genre de chose qui se fait aujourd’hui, et c’est un moyen d’offrir cette source de renseignements. C’est pour ça que je suis plus qu’heureux de venir ici aujourd’hui. Mais j’espère que je n’ai pas pris trop de temps, j’ai parlé comme deux hommes. Merci.